Share

Adama Delphine Fawundu’s work Aligned with Sodpet will be shown in her new collection at the Granary Arts gallery

 

Granary Arts features three artists

with unique styles of expression

2-6-2020

 

Granary Arts is pleased to present three new solo exhibitions featuring different perspectives of photography and filmmaking.
The new exhibitions can be seen Feb. 12. Glass-plate photographer Kari Laine will display her works The Rhizome Remains until May 2. Photo-based multi-media pieces by Adama Delphine Fawundu Tingoi will also run until May 2. And filmmaker Jan Andrews will show Honor and Dissonance until March 20.
A reception will be held at Granary Arts, 86 N. Main Street in Ephraim, from 6-8 p.m. on Friday, Feb. 28. The gallery is open Wednesday – Saturday, from 11 a.m. to 5 p.m.
The exhibits of Laine and Fawunda are both curated by J. Sybylla Smith.

Kari Laine: The Rhizome Remains
Inspired by the botanical term “rhizome” and its philosophical counterpart, which suggest that all things are connected, Laine’s exhibition—The Rhizome Remains—hints at a hope for the future.
A visual artist based in the Midwest, Laine grew up in an artistic and artisan family. As a child, she explored the river, streams, and woods of Wisconsin’s countryside, and she now draws inspiration from ghost stories, mythical figures, and the spirits of the land that surround her family home and studio. Through glass-plate photography, Kari explores the possibility that small, found objects—seemingly insignificant and often overlooked, viewed as trash or junk—can be remade through a story that gives them agency, a kind of power or voice. Laine is currently a MA Visual Critical Studies Candidate at the School of the Art Institute of Chicago, focusing on glass-plate photography and ecological sustainability. www.karilaine.com

Adama Delphine Fawundu: Tingoi
As the only child in her immediate family born in America, Fawundu’s connection to Sierra Leone is through stories told by her parents. Her memories shape her latest work where she manifests conversations between multiple African deities and the forceful extraction of her people due to slavery.
Fawundu uses photo-based multi-media to unfold the layers of the stories she knows to create new ones. She reimagines, reenacts and recreates Afro futurist identities representing a new narrative, and honoring the complex history of the African Diaspora.
She is a co-founder and author of the book and movement, MFON: Women Photographers of the African Diaspora. She is currently an artist-in-resident at the Center for Book Arts in NYC. www.delphinefawundu.com

Kari Laine’s Loop and Whirls will be part of her exhibit at the Granary Arts gallery from Feb. 12 until May 2.

Jan Andrews: Honor and Dissonance
Jan Andrews has been making films for 37 years and her work is deeply informed by her research and training as an anthropologist, and her travels abroad. On exhibition are two films created 14 years apart, both exploring the delicate landscape of mental states.
In Suspect Terrain is an experimental meditation on amnesia and schizophrenia, examining the injured brain and how it reacts to shattered memory, and complete loss of memory.
Kamikazi (Divine Wind) is an experimental video based on a booklet the Japanese Government gave to young men selected to fly planes into enemy ships during World War II. The booklet instructed them how to die with honor for the empire.
Andrews is an award-winning independent filmmaker and has been working in experimental and documentary genres since 1983. She was born in California and spent her later childhood in Utah. After completing a BA, MA, and PhD studies in Anthropology at the University of Utah, Andrews began making films while researching her PhD thesis in Egypt. She joined the University of Utah film program after returning from her time abroad, and earned an MFA in Production and Film Theory in 1996.
Her films have received numerous awards including Best of Show, Directors Choice, and are in the collection of Anthology Film Archives in NYC.

Jan Andrew’s will be showing this film In Suspect Terrain at the Granary Arts gallery from Feb. 12 until March 20.