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Utah Rep. Derrin Owens of Fountain Green (left) congratulates Scott Collard following Collard’s appointment as mayor of Fountain Green. The current mayor, Willard Wood, is moving to Idaho.

 

Fountain Green Council appoints

Scott Collard to fill mayoral term

 

By Suzanne Dean

Publisher

9-3-2020

 

FOUNTAIN GREEN—An applicant who made a passionate plea for community unity was appointed as mayor of Fountain Green following a meeting that filled the city council chamber last Thursday, Aug. 27.

The new mayor will be Scott Collard, who served 12 years on the city council and 12 years as mayor in the 1990s and early 2000s. Professionally, he is vice president of Cache Valley Electric, but said he mostly works from home.

Collard was one of seven residents who applied to replace Willard Wood, who has been mayor for the past three years. He resigned because he and his wife have purchased land and plan to build a home near Tetonia, Idaho, near where they lived before moving to Fountain Green.

Collard was selected by vote of the city council. He will fill out Wood’s term, which runs until January, 2022. To continue after that, he will have to run in the November, 2021 municipal election.

Other applicants were Abby Ivory, a mortgage broker who has been on the Lamb Day committee and chairwoman of the Miss Lamb Day pageant; Clint Hansen, who is retired from the Utah National Guard; and Jerime Ivory, a former city councilman who serves on the volunteer fire department.

Still others were Mark Coombs, who has been on the council twice, has been a volunteer fireman and served with the Sanpete County Fire District; Ron Ivory, a former mayor, former justice court judge and long-time leader in the Fountain Green Lions Club; and Zoe Cook, a current member of the Miss Lamb Day royalty and a college student.

The themes of the meeting were community unity and population growth. A number of applicants talked about the community dividing into different groups. While no one talked about the basis for the divisions, some of the applicants talked about the need to welcome newcomers.

The city council posed a series of questions to each of the applicants. One was whether people outside the city should be able to serve with the volunteer fire department and other community organizations. Recently, the city council voted to suspend the fire department bylaws, dismiss the fire chief and appoint a chief who lived in Moroni. Some fire department members complained about the action and discussed resigning.

In response to a couple of different questions posed to applicants, Collard said community unity was “the thing I’m most passionate about.”

“In order to find unity in our community, we all need to [go] in the same direction, because right now I feel like we’re splintering into groups,” he said.

At another point, he said the city council has to run the town, and when the council makes a decision, residents need to support the decision. If citizens don’t support the council, “it’s just going to spiral downward” and it will be hard to find anyone who wants to serve on the council, planning and zoning or the fire department.

“We’ve sat here and talked about all the growth we’re going to have in the community,” Collard said in response to the final question posed to the applicants. “With that growth, why would we not extend ourselves and welcome people who are wanting to come here,” not just to live but to participate?

“…As long as we exclude people who want to participate, we are not doing the right thing,” Collard said. “If we can get everyone included, and we can love everyone, we can grow as a community.”

Regarding growth, the consensus was that there’s no way to stop people from moving in, but growth has to be controlled.

Referring to planning and zoning, Clint Hansen said, “The rules are the rules. We have to follow them. As we grow, we want to do it in consideration of all of our citizens. My rights stop where your rights start, and I think that’s critical.”

Jerime Ivory said it takes at least 2 percent growth “to sustain a community” but a community can’t grow so fast the infrastructure can’t handle it. Mark Coombs said, “…You better have a five-year plan, whether it be water, whether it be land.”

Collard said Fountain Green also needs an annexation plan to define the direction of residential growth, because some land just outside the city limits is in the flood plain. He also said the town needs to attract businesses in order to have a revenue source other than raising water rates and property taxes.

Both Abby Ivory and Zoe Cook expressed concerns about the city council being transparent and getting information out to citizens.

Ivory said city council minutes should be posted to the website and more announcements posted to the city Facebook page so residents aren’t relying on rumor. Cook said, “It’s very hard for everyone if they don’t have correct information.”

While the council was waiting for their votes to be tallied, Councilwoman Shelith Jacobson said everyone has biases, things they may have been taught growing up. “We need to set those aside” and accept everyone, she said.

After announcing Collard’s selection, Mayor Wood said, “It’s been a wonderful meeting.” He added that he was glad he ran for mayor and described his three years in office as “a real growing experience.”

The new mayor will be Scott Collard, who served 12 years on the city council and 12 years as mayor in the 1990s and early 2000s. Professionally, he is vice president of Cache Valley Electric, but said he mostly works from home.

Collard was one of seven residents who applied to replace Willard Wood, who has been mayor for the past three years. He resigned because he and his wife have purchased land and plan to build a home near Tetonia, Idaho, near where they lived before moving to Fountain Green.

Collard was selected by vote of the city council. He will fill out Wood’s term, which runs until January, 2022. To continue after that, he will have to run in the November, 2021 municipal election.

Other applicants were Abby Ivory, a mortgage broker who has been on the Lamb Day committee and chairwoman of the Miss Lamb Day pageant; Clint Hansen, who is retired from the Utah National Guard; and Jerime Ivory, a former city councilman who serves on the volunteer fire department.

Still others were Mark Coombs, who has been on the council twice, has been a volunteer fireman and served with the Sanpete County Fire District; Ron Ivory, a former mayor, former justice court judge and long-time leader in the Fountain Green Lions Club; and Zoe Cook, a current member of the Miss Lamb Day royalty and a college student.

The themes of the meeting were community unity and population growth. A number of applicants talked about the community dividing into different groups. While no one talked about the basis for the divisions, some of the applicants talked about the need to welcome newcomers.

The city council posed a series of questions to each of the applicants. One was whether people outside the city should be able to serve with the volunteer fire department and other community organizations. Recently, the city council voted to suspend the fire department bylaws, dismiss the fire chief and appoint a chief who lived in Moroni. Some fire department members complained about the action and discussed resigning.

In response to a couple of different questions posed to applicants, Collard said community unity was “the thing I’m most passionate about.”

“In order to find unity in our community, we all need to [go] in the same direction, because right now I feel like we’re splintering into groups,” he said.

At another point, he said the city council has to run the town, and when the council makes a decision, residents need to support the decision. If citizens don’t support the council, “it’s just going to spiral downward” and it will be hard to find anyone who wants to serve on the council, planning and zoning or the fire department.

“We’ve sat here and talked about all the growth we’re going to have in the community,” Collard said in response to the final question posed to the applicants. “With that growth, why would we not extend ourselves and welcome people who are wanting to come here,” not just to live but to participate?

“…As long as we exclude people who want to participate, we are not doing the right thing,” Collard said. “If we can get everyone included, and we can love everyone, we can grow as a community.”

Regarding growth, the consensus was that there’s no way to stop people from moving in, but growth has to be controlled.

Referring to planning and zoning, Clint Hansen said, “The rules are the rules. We have to follow them. As we grow, we want to do it in consideration of all of our citizens. My rights stop where your rights start, and I think that’s critical.”

Jerime Ivory said it takes at least 2 percent growth “to sustain a community” but a community can’t grow so fast the infrastructure can’t handle it. Mark Coombs said, “…You better have a five-year plan, whether it be water, whether it be land.”

Collard said Fountain Green also needs an annexation plan to define the direction of residential growth, because some land just outside the city limits is in the flood plain. He also said the town needs to attract businesses in order to have a revenue source other than raising water rates and property taxes.

Both Abby Ivory and Zoe Cook expressed concerns about the city council being transparent and getting information out to citizens.

Ivory said city council minutes should be posted to the website and more announcements posted to the city Facebook page so residents aren’t relying on rumor. Cook said, “It’s very hard for everyone if they don’t have correct information.”

While the council was waiting for their votes to be tallied, Councilwoman Shelith Jacobson said everyone has biases, things they may have been taught growing up. “We need to set those aside” and accept everyone, she said.

After announcing Collard’s selection, Mayor Wood said, “It’s been a wonderful meeting.” He added that he was glad he ran for mayor and described his three years in office as “a real growing experience.”

 

 

Scott Collards talks with Holly Oldroyd, a former city council member, following Collards appointment to fill out the term of Mayor Willard Wood, who is moving from the area.