Katie Brotherson, Sophia Sayles, Easton Brotherson, Preston Aagard (front), Brandon Harlee Aagard (back), enjoyed Memorial Day by decorating their second cousin’s (Kymberlee and Kylee Christensen) grave. Many of the decorations shown here were stolen a few days after the picture was taken.

‘Seriously, what kind of person steals off graves?’

Painful, bewildering, all too common

Suzanne Dean

Publisher

6/22/2017

“Seriously, what kind of person steals off graves?”

The question, written in a Facebook post by Tammy Coates of Spring City, captures the pain and bewilderment victims feel regarding a phenomenon that appears to happen year after year, in all parts of Sanpete County, and beyond the county.

Coates has ample cause to grieve. On May 31, her daughter, Kammy Edmunds, who was 34, died from what police described as “blunt force trauma” to her head. She left two children behind, a 12-year-old boy and 4-year-old girl.

The death appears to be a classic domestic violence homicide. Edmunds’ boyfriend, Anthony Christensen, was arrested and later charged with homicide and desecration of a body.

Referring to theft of grave decorations, Coates wrote, “I know it happens. You see heartbroken posts and letters to the editor of the papers about this, and it sickens me.”

Then she told her own story. “I had hanging planters on Kammy Mae’s grave (in the Spring City Cemetery),” she wrote. “We had talked to the…caretakers, and they were okay with them. They were watered and well cared for because I want her resting place to be beautiful.

“Well, yup, somebody stole them. I’ve spoken with the caretakers, and it wasn’t them.” Coates wrote that she went back to the site later to leave a shaming note and two solar angels were also gone from the grave.

Within a day or two, 40 people replied to Coates’ post. The majority expressed sympathy. Many wrote that the same thing had happened to them.

Bonnie Keisel of Ephraim wrote simply: “So soorrrryyyy.”

Charlotte White of Mt. Pleasant wrote, “I’m so sorry people are so rude and disrespectful. We had things stolen off my dad’s grave, also.”

Angela Bailey Johnson of Spanish Fork, formerly of Mt. Pleasant, wrote, “People are so disrespectful and care about no one but themselves. This makes me so sad. Karma will get whoever did this.”

A week or two earlier and a few towns away, Karen Christensen of Manti had a similar experience and also told her story on Facebook, triggering a similar response.

She is the mother of twins girls born with a genetic disorder that caused them to be severely disabled. Early in the girls’ lives, doctors told her they would not live beyond their late teens or early 20s.

Christensen devoted more than 20 years to caring for her twins. In 2007, Kylee Marie died at 19. Four years later, Kymberlee Lyn died at 24.

They were buried in the Manti City Cemetery. The grave has a double headstone containing two hearts. Each daughter’s name, birth date and death date are engraved inside a heart.

One way Christensen connects with the girls is by decorating their graves. She decorates each year on their birthdays, one the day each girl died and every Memorial Day.

On Friday, May 28, a couple of days before Memorial Day, Christensen went to the cemetery with several bouquets, a wreath and other decorations, including two miniature fairy cottages with solar lights inside, two flower sticks containing solar lights and two butterfly sticks that had glitter on the butterflies. The decorations cost about $70.

Cemetery rules permit decorations posted over Memorial Day weekend to stay in the cemetery until one week after Memorial Day. A sign is always posted saying when decorations must be removed “and I’ve always followed that,” Christensen said.

After decorating the graves on Friday, she returned to the cemetery on Saturday, Sunday and Monday. Everything was still there. But when she went back Wednesday, the lighted fairy cottages and butterfly stakes were gone.

“I was hurt,” she says. “I put things on there that mean something to me, associated with the memory of those girls. No one has a right to take those things. We put them out for the public to enjoy, but not to take.”

At 8:38 that night, Christensen posted a message on Facebook addressed to whoever took the decorations. “You should be ashamed of yourself, and I’m mad,” she wrote, “If you thought they would look good in your flower garden, you ought to think twice because I will be watching.”

Within a few days, 53 people responded.

Polly Wolfe of Manti, a widow, wrote that in a number of different years, items she had placed on her husband’s grave in the Manti Cemetery had been taken. “I’ve thought about putting out a trail camera, but they’d probably steal that, too,” she wrote.

LuDon Augustus of Manti wrote that “for the last two years, everything was taken from my parents’ graves” in the Sterling Town Cemetery.

Kalleen Braithwaite, who lost both her husband and a daughter at premature ages, wrote that in 2016, vandals ripped a marble vase that was built into one of her headstones off the stone and broke the vase. Flowers from both her husband’s and her daughter’s graves were also taken.

A few years ago, another woman in Manti, who asked not to be named in this article, caught the people who took decorations off her parents’ graves.

The woman said she and other family members usually decorate the graves in the Manti City Cemetery on Mother’s Day, Father’s Day and Memorial Day.

Three or four years ago, after one of the holidays, the family left a plant hanger with two large potted plants at the gravesite, which is permissible under cemetery rules. The woman’s brother went to the cemetery every day to water the plants.

Then, just like in the Christensen case, the woman went to the cemetery the Wednesday after Memorial Day. The hanger and pots, along with other flowers, were gone.

The woman let friends and family know about the theft. Before long, a neighbor called and said she had seen a significant cache of what looked like grave decorations in a yard in Manti.

The woman went to the house in question, and sure enough, there was her plant hanger (she’d had the foresight to carve her initials into it), and two pots of flowers that belonged to her. After getting permission, she took back her belongings. Then she contacted authorities.

The resident of the house where her decorations (and by all appearances, decorations taken from other graves) were found, pleaded guilty to a misdemeanor, paid a fine and was required to write a public apology letter, which was published in the Sanpete Messenger.

            Sanpete County Attorney Brody Keisel said there is no state statute specifically addressing theft of grave decorations. Such thefts are covered under general theft statutes, and the level of charges depends on the monetary value of items taken.

Spring City seeks to balance budget while adding new positions in police, fire and utilities departments

 

Terrel Davs

For the Messenger

6/22/2017

 

SPRING CITY—Would the cost of hiring a fulltime city treasurer more than pay for itself and other Spring City budgetary needs if that treasurer was successful in finding other sources of income for the city?

That question is one that some members of the Spring City Council wrestled with but ultimately set aside for further consideration.

With the end of one fiscal year and the start of another soon approaching (on July 1), the city council mulled over how to create a balanced budget, particularly given the recently created position of fulltime police and fire chief the city must now pay for.

The city is also seeking to hire an apprentice lineman, further increasing employee costs for the city.

As it is, the current year’s budget required a nearly $180,000 infusion from the city’s electric, water and sewer funds. Prior to the city council meeting, the council held a public hearing on making those transfers (about $58,000 from each of the three accounts) which were later approved.

How then to balance, then—especially in light of Spring City’s minimal business-tax base—an enlarged budget?

It was in this context that Spring City Treasurer Lurlynn Potter, who now works part-time, made a proposal that might at first seem counterintuitive: Hire her fulltime.

Potter made a case for allowing her to research potential funding sources for the city, such as writing grant proposals and promoting tourism. However, to do this over her existing workload would make her a fulltime employee, which would add an even further $19,000 to the city’s budget.

Council members bantered the question among themselves, asking, “Would the cost of a fulltime treasurer be worth the expense?”

But Potter’s proposal had implications for the both sides of the budget fence, income as well as expenses.

She reviewed the income received by grants by other communities in the area, from a low of $300,000 in Moroni to over $1 million in both Fairview and Mt. Pleasant. She also noted her own track record of finding funds when she spent two years as Snow College’s alumni and donor-relations manager.

Council members discussed the possibility of making Potter’s position fulltime on a one-year trial basis, but ultimately wanted the full council’s input. The idea was set aside until the council’s next meeting when all members could be present.

Another budget item is the need for IT/computer services and equipment at the new Old School Community Center.

Councilwoman Kimberly Stewart said she brought representatives from each of these companies into the building and asked for their recommendations  regarding what it would take and how much it would cost to provide high-speed internet and Wi-Fi throughout the building with continuing support and maintenance.

Three bids were opened, ranging from $8,200-$21,000.

However, this item was also tabled until more of the council could be present.

Courtesy, candor and carefulness keys to resolving odor problem in Moroni

 

6/22/2017

 

Anyone who has lived in Sanpete County for any length of time is probably accustomed (or should be) to the smells of rural living.

Admittedly, those smells are more pasture than pastoral; the bucolic beauty of our locale comes with certain olfactory costs.

But the stench emanating from a three-month old wastewater lagoon at Norbest in Moroni is more than citizens should have to endure for more than the briefest period of time.

Moroni citizens are rightly upset at Norbest for what, under any public-policy definition as well as regular colloquy, would be called a nuisance.

A more-or-less legal definition of nuisance is “the substantial interference with the use and enjoyment of land and property.”

The lagoon fits that definition. Just ask any longtime aging Moroni couple not sitting in their porch chairs in the cool of the evening because they cannot bear the odor.

At the outset, we should say that we recognize the turkey plant as a vital, integral part of the local economy. If not the heart, it is at least representative of the heart of the area’s agriculture lifestyle as well as livelihood.

It has attempted, which has not always been easy, to be a good and responsible neighbor. As CEO Matt Cook wrote in a prepared statement, “We breath the same air as our neighbors.”

And use the same water, which is why a few years ago the plant partnered with the city to build a new sewer system when, largely due to the stress placed on the existing sewer at that time, the system failed certain environmental-protection tests. Things were so bad that the continued operation of the Moroni sewer system was in jeopardy.

Norbest has always maintained an open-air wastewater basin. But in 2015, with the continued growth of production at the plant (for which we are grateful), the basin proved insufficient and overflowed.

The state required remediation, which included a newer and bigger lagoon.

Odor, as explained by the company and experts, is to be expected from any brand new open-aired waste lagoon while it is still settling and stabilizing.

The company recently iterated three planned measures to remediate the odor. They include a “malodor counteractant,” chemicals that will reduce the odor; the addition of microbes that will breakdown the waste components (they were not initially added on the advice from waste-treatment engineers, the company said); and certain yet-to-be-decided “pre-treatment” options to separate out some of the waste material prior to dumping into the lagoon.

And the smell will naturally decrease as the lagoon settles and an “upper layer” is formed.

That’s about as far as we can go in terms of exoneration; it is not only the stink that stinks:

• In a letter to Moroni’s residents dated May 30, the company admits “it was anticipated that initially the smell would be stronger due to the time needed for the lagoon to build and properly set up.”

Why in the name of sulfur and brimstone, if the company expected the smell, did it not proactively implement as many of the counter measures as it could?

In legal cases, much rides on the phrase “knew or should have known.” The company knew. To not have planned in advance was either careless or thoughtless.

• Since things have blown up, Norbest has become more forthcoming with information. The company wrote a letter that, according to Mayor Luke Freeman, was delivered to all Moroni residents.

The letter does a lot to help explain things, maybe even to the point of assuaging some real rancor. (However, the letter was dated May 30; there was still quite a bit of discontent at a city meeting fully two weeks later).

Why didn’t the company, or the city for that matter, warn residents what to expect?

• In CEO Cook’s written statement, he said, “We will work hard to keep the lines of communication open,” but only after closing to all but a trickle those lines to the Messenger, declining an interview.

Going forward, we hope Cook and other company officials do, indeed, make candor and open communication a priority.

• And while we have said little about potential hazards, we feel we need to. Norbest needs to be exceptionally vigilant in maintaining and monitoring health and environmental protections at the lagoon, particularly any potential contamination of the main city well 1,000 yards away.
Summing up, officials from Norbest, Moroni City and the state, anyone who has a part in resolving this mess؅, would do well to keep three “Cs” firmly in mind: Courtesy, candor and carefulness.

Freshman Harley Hansen struggles to find room for offense in the SWAC Championship Game in Salt Lake City. The Lady Badgers fell to Salt Lake, 67-40, ending their season. - Kyler Daybell / Messenger photo

Freshman Harley Hansen struggles to find room for offense in the SWAC Championship Game in Salt Lake City. The Lady Badgers fell to Salt Lake, 67-40, ending their season. – Kyler Daybell / Messenger photo

 

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Hannah Holbrook points out the day’s weather in Spanish to her classmates including center, Mackenzie Thomson and Isaac Anderson.

Hannah Holbrook points out the day’s weather in Spanish to her classmates including center, Mackenzie Thomson and Isaac Anderson.

 

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Parker Judy (first attendant), Hunter Anderson (Mr. Bulldog 2017), Hunter Peterson (second attendant) pose for the camera after Gunnison Valley High School's Mr. Bulldog contest. - Photo courtesy Melissa Judy

Parker Judy (first attendant), Hunter Anderson (Mr. Bulldog 2017), Hunter Peterson (second attendant) pose for the camera after Gunnison Valley High School’s Mr. Bulldog contest. – Photo courtesy Melissa Judy

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Drive4Food fundraising event Date Location
Sixth Annual Drive4Food Golf Tournament June 10 Skyline Mountain Resort Golf Course
Second Annual Fourth of July 10K/5K Fun Run July 4 In conjunction with Hub City Days in Mt. Pleasant
Fourth Annual OHV Ride July 22 In conjunction with Fairview City Pioneer Days
Drive4Food Bowling Tournament Aug 12 Sno-Cap Lanes in Ephraim
Halloween Costume 5K Fun Run Oct 31 Mt Pleasant Halloween celebration

 

 

Drive4Food announces fundraising schedule for 2017

 

 

 

 

Robert Stevens

Managing editor

1-26-2017

 

MT. PLEASANT—Drive4Food, a local organization dedicated to helping raise funds for the Sanpete Pantry, has announced its fundraising event schedule for 2017.

“This will be our sixth year raising funds for the Sanpete Pantry,” says Jeff Jarman, president of Drive4Food.  “We started out hosting a golf tournament at Skyline Mountain Resort Golf Course, and because of the amazing support from our communities, we have added four other events to help generate funds for the pantry.”

This year will see the sixth annual Drive4Food Golf Tournament scheduled on June 10 at Skyline Mountain Resort Golf Course.

July 22 is the date for the fourth annual OHV Ride held in conjunction with Fairview City Pioneer Days.

The second  annual July Fourth 10K/5K Fun Run will be held in conjunction with Hub City Days in Mt. Pleasant.

On Aug. 12, the Drive4Food Bowling Tournament will be hosted by SnoCap Lanes in Ephraim.

The Halloween Costume 5K Fun Run will take place on Oct. 31 in Mt. Pleasant.

According to Jarman, funds raised at Drive4Food events support operations ranging from the Kid Pack program supplying food to elementary school students at risk of going without over the weekend, to replacing inefficient equipment, to just keeping the lights burning.

Drive4Food is registered with the State of Utah Division of Consumer Protection. The group says 99 percent of all donations go to the Sanpete Pantry.

For more information call 462-3006.

A special red jacket adorns Madison Walker. The jacket is an award that the Family Career and Community Leaders of America say demonstrates true leadership. Madison is pictured with Vivian Morris, chapter president.

A special red jacket adorns Madison Walker. The jacket is an award that the Family Career and Community Leaders of America say demonstrates true leadership. Madison is pictured with Vivian Morris, chapter president.

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Leonard Blackham, former state senator and commissioner of agriculture, displays a plaque recognizing him as a member of the Horne School of Music Hall of Fame at Snow College.

Leonard Blackham, former state senator and commissioner of agriculture, displays a plaque recognizing him as a member of the Horne School of Music Hall of Fame at Snow College.

 

Leonard Blackham named to Horne Music Hall of Fame

 

12-22-2016

 

EPHRAIM — Leonard Blackham of Moroni, former Utah commissioner of agriculture and Utah state senator, was recently named to the Horne School of Music Hall of Fame at Snow College.

A plaque was presented to Blackham on Saturday, Dec. 3 during the music school’s Holiday Spectacular at the Eccles Center for the Performing Arts, a building Blackham helped get funded.

Blackham took over his family turkey operation in 1970 and built it from 36,000 to 360,000 birds per year. He served for several years on the board of directors of Moroni Feed Co., including time as chairman of the board

He served four years as a county commissioner before being elected to the Utah State Senate. He was then appointed commissioner of agriculture, a post he held for nine years.

According to a citation read at the Holiday Spectacular, during his time as state senator, Blackham worked to get funding for restoration of the Noyes Building and construction of what became the Eccles Center.

In accepting the award, Blackham recalled inviting then Gov. Michael Leavitt to the college. As Leavitt strode into the Activities Center, instrumental groups struck up a chorus of “Hail to the Chief.” After that, Leavitt became a supporter of a fine arts facility at Snow, Blackham said.

Blackham currently serves on the Snow College Foundation Board and Snow Business Department Advisory Board. He and his wife, Laura, formerly served on the Fine Arts Department Advisory Board.

Stanley Adams

Stanley Adams

 

 

 

It is with great sadness that we announce the passing of Stanley Ray Adams.  Our Husband and Dad passed away surrounded by his family of complications of a stroke, brought on by a heart attack.

Stan was born November 6, 1947 to Von Stanley and Leah June Doty Adams.

Stan graduated from Granger High School in 1966 and joined the Navy shortly after.  He was very proud to have served his Country and to be a Veteran.  It seems fitting that he passed away on Veteran’s Day.

Stan married Irene Broadbent on September 18, 1970.  Their marriage was later solomized in the Salt Lake Temple, January 25, 1991.  They were fortunate to have spent 46 years together.  Our Dad loved our Mom and they had so much fun together.  We are grateful that they were able to spend the last year traveling and laughing.

Traveling and being in the outdoors, hunting and fishing were a few of his favorite things.  Lake Powell was his favorite place and we spent many years there as a family, always over Father’s Day.  Dad was very proud of his family and was always so supportive.  We know our Dad loved us.

Stan worked for IHC for 20 years where he made life long friends and truly enjoyed his job.

Stan had a big heart and was always the first to show up to help.  He did so much for others, never wanting or expecting recognition.

Survived by his wife and children; Heath (Jeannie), Brandi (Tyler), Kaysie (Tim), Richard Silcock.  Former son-in-law, Justin Robinson and his 12 grandchildren with one on the way, whom he is spending time with now.

Preceded in death by his parents, father-in-law, Donald Broadbent, brother-in-law, Austin Henrie and dear friend Winn Frame, whom he has missed so much.

Funeral Services were held Tuesday, November 15th, 2016 at 11:00 a.m. at the Mountainville Ward, 461 N. 300 W., Mt. Pleasant, Utah with a viewing from 9:00-10:30 a.m.  A Graveside Service was held Wednesday, November 16th, 2016, 11:00 a.m. at the Tonaquint Cemetery.  1777 S. Dixie Drive, St. George, Utah. Online condolence rasmussenmortuary.com

 

Inside Our Schools

 

Daniela Vazquez

Staff writer

12-8-2016

 

 

Covin Keeler, fourth-grader at Manti Elementary, opened up schools Christmas program on Monday evening at Manti High. The show began with kindergarteners sharing a message about giving by singing “The Very Best Part of Christmas.” - Daniela Vazquez / Messenger photo

Covin Keeler, fourth-grader at Manti Elementary, opened up schools Christmas program on Monday evening at Manti High. The show began with kindergarteners sharing a message about giving by singing “The Very Best Part of Christmas.” – Daniela Vazquez / Messenger photo

 

Christmas break for students in the South Sanpete School District will begin on Friday, Dec. 16. Kids will be released from school based on their school’s early-out schedule. Classes will reconvene on Monday, Jan. 2.

Students in the North Sanpete School District will begin Christmas break on Dec. 20. School will be dismissed at noon.

 

 

 

North Sanpete High

            The school has sponsored a Sub for Santa for the past five years, and this year the students have chosen to carry on the tradition. Student Body Officers are working in conjunction with local marines to raise money for the Toys for Tots Foundation. Thus far, students have helped raise $2,100, and are hoping for more before the drive ends tomorrow.

The officers have chosen the gender of a child they want to shop for with the donation money, and will go shopping at Walmart to purchase the toys on Dec. 10. Toys will be dropped off at Snow West Campus and stored in a warehouse. Afterwards, children will meet with a marine and go shopping the warehouse.

Please deliver last minute monetary or new and unopened toys to NSH before 3:30 p.m. on Dec. 9.

 

North Sanpete Middle School

Marcos Serrano, North Sanpete Middle School student, sits with Mason Bailey (right), North Sanpete High freshman class president, in Biology class; one of several he will attend with Mason during the schools’ first ever “Hawk for a Day” program.  - Daniela Vazquez / Messenger photo

Marcos Serrano, North Sanpete Middle School student, sits with Mason Bailey (right), North Sanpete High freshman class president, in Biology class; one of several he will attend with Mason during the schools’ first ever “Hawk for a Day” program. – Daniela Vazquez / Messenger photo

            Students are pleased to present a Christmas Band Concert on Tuesday, Dec. 13 at 6 p.m. at the school. Everyone in the community is invited to attend.

 

 

 

Ephraim Middle School       

            The band and orchestra will present the Sounds of the Season concert in the auditorium on Dec. 9 at 5 p.m. Everyone in the community are invited to attend and enjoy music that complements the sounds of the Christmas Season.

 

 

 

Ephraim Elementary

            Students will perform in a Christmas program on Tuesday, Dec. 13 at 6:30 p.m. in the Snow College Activity Center.

The sixth-grade Band and Orchestra will also perform a Christmas concert tomorrow at 6 p.m. in the Ephraim Middle School Commons.

 

 

Manti Elementary

            Every year students from Manti Elementary prepare a Christmas program for the community. The entire student body sang in a choral program to spread the Christmas spirit. This year, the master minds behind the decorations and theme were the students. The fifth-graders created a cubic city, an idea that was inspired through math.

Discovering potential through arts creativity (DPAC) and Anne’s Dance Academy will showcase their dancing talent in a Christmas program at Manti High on Saturday at 6:30 p.m.

Local Vocals, Dec. 15. at 6 p.m. Eva Beal Auditorium.

 

 

 

Manti High

            Drama student will hold a radio-style rendition of a classic Dr. Seuss favorite “The Grinch” at 6 p.m. in the Manti High Auditorium on Monday, Dec. 12 and Thursday, Dec. 15.

The play can be compared to a live-on-stage 1930’s radio show with live sound effects.     “This will be a unique experience and a different type show,” Kory Howard, MHS teacher, said. “With all the live effects, it should be really fun.”

Everyone is invited to attend the performances in support of the hard work teens put into the production. General admission is $2.00.

 

 

 

Spring City Elementary

            The PTA reached their respective $2,500 book fair sales goal, and soon, kids will reap the benefits with a unique learning experience.

The PTA says they will buy three listening stations with the money they earned. The stations allow students to listen to audio books, a way to improve listening skills, and give teachers the ability to record custom activities for their students. Each station is set up to allow six students to listen to the book at the same time they read the hard copy, Pamela Anderson, school librarian says.

A fundraising campaign has been established to help the family of Gunnison City Police Chief Trent Halliday (seen here). Halliday, a lawman, football coach, and father of three, was recently diagnosed with stage 4 cancer.

A fundraising campaign has been established to help the family of Gunnison City Police Chief Trent Halliday (seen here). Halliday, a lawman, football coach, and father of three, was recently diagnosed with stage 4 cancer.

 

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Dustin Zeeman is wearing his Scout bandalo sporting 142 merit badges, all the merit badges the Scouts offer. He is holding his Order of the Arrow sash signifying admission to the Scout honor society.

Dustin Zeeman is wearing his Scout bandalo sporting 142 merit badges, all the merit badges the Scouts offer. He is holding his Order of the Arrow sash signifying admission to the Scout honor society.

Centerfield Scout earns every merit badge – all 142 of them

 

Robert Stevens

Managing editor

11-24-2016

 

CENTERFIELD—Many 18-year-olds have a few trophies, awards or even a high school letter signifying their accomplishments. But few have anything approaching what Dustin Zeeman has.

The son of Dee and Beverly Zeeman, Dustin recently became the first Boy Scout in the Arapeen District to earn all possible merit badge—at this time 142.

“I am not aware of another Scout that has done this in the Arapeen District,” said Jay Zabriskie, communications director for the district, which encompasses Sanpete, Sevier and Wayne counties and the Fillmore area in Millard County.

Merit badges can be earned in a broad range of subjects ranging from sports, crafts and science to trades, business and future careers

Dustin said it’s been quite a journey since he was originally motivated by his then-Scout master Matt Reber of Axtell, who promised his 13-year-old Scouts a rifle if they earned all of the merit badges.

Dustin ended up receiving a rifle from his parents when he got his Eagle award. The butt contains a round metal piece showing the Boy Scout shield. The housing around the trigger is silver and is engraved with various slogans, such one saying “Once an Eagle, always an Eagle.”

“I think he’s very dedicated,” his Venturing adviser Brad Worch said of Dustin. “Getting them all is an achievement. He’s a good young man.”

Dustin said the process of obtaining all those merit badges has been worth it.

“It helped me mature and get a better understanding of what real life is going to be like,” he said. “It has also helped a lot in developing leadership abilities.”

Dustin said his friends think “it’s a cool accomplishment.” But the path he has traveled to reach this point has been mainly on his own, with a hand from his mom, Beverly.

“I have to give my mom quite a bit of credit. She helped keep me going,” Dustin said. In fact, when Dustin was a Cub Scout, Beverly was his Cub master.

Beverly said Dustin has always been “a really easy-going great kid, willing to help people” and easily made the transition to rural life when the family moved to Centerfield in 2006. Dustin is actually Canadian, having been born in Lethbridge, Alberta where his mom is from.

As a young Scout, Dustin started out going to merit badge pow-wows, which enabled him to earn three merit badges in three weeks. But as time went on, it became more difficult to find classes for the merit badges he wanted. He said he often had to search all over Sanpete, Sevier and even Utah counties to find merit badge counselors.

With one in particular, Oceanography, the Zeemans just couldn’t find anyone. So his mom signed up to be the counselor. Dustin completed the requirements for that merit badge at Scofield Lake.

His favorite merit badge was Aviation where he got to fly a plane, thanks to the generosity of a pilot at an air show held at Mt. Pleasant Airport in 2010.

Dustin said his most difficult merit badge was “sustainability.” The requirements weren’t that difficult, he said, but there was a lack of knowledge in the Boy Scout community about the requirements.

“I had to take three different classes to get that one,” he said. One class had 20 Scouts in it, but none of them got the badge, he said, because it turned out there was a requirement nobody involved with the class was aware of.

Along the way, he also earned his Eagle Scout award. For his Eagle project, he built two solar dehydrators for an Arizona Hopi Indian reservation.

During this time, Dustin didn’t just earn merit badges—he also shared his knowledge as a merit badge counselor at Camp TIFIE, the big Scout camp east of Mt. Pleasant, for two years, something he really enjoyed.

He said one of his funniest teaching experiences was when he taught the radio merit badge and sent Scouts on a scavenger hunt to track down a signal. The thing he didn’t tell the Scouts was that he had put the beacon in the camel pack of another Scout and instruct him to run around camp.

“There were times when I’d see that kid pass by three or four times, and they wouldn’t even know it. That was funny,” he said.

Currently, Dustin, who is a member of  Venturing crew 1389 and the Order of the Arrow (the Boy Scout national honor society), is completing high school online and expects to graduate in December. After that, he plans to go to school in Arizona to become a diesel mechanic.

He hopes to stay involved in Scouts and to possibly serve as an adult Scout leader down the road.

“I’ve gone through so many Scout masters and different Scout leaders,” he said, giving particular praise to those who, he said, were really involved. “I’d prefer to be like them, to help and motivate the kids and give them a reason to come to Scouts.”

Generally, he has high praise for the merit badge program but said he would really like to see it become more hands-on.

“Most people are hands-on learners like me,” he said. “It’s easier to pay attention when you’re actually doing things than if you’re just in a classroom listening to people talk.”

 

Judges will be retained in service

 

Robert Stevens

Managing editor

11-10-2016

 

The judge retention results in Tuesday night’s election have Judge Ivo Peterson being retained in four Sanpete County Justice Courts and Judge Paul Lyman being retained as Sixth District Juvenile Court judge.

Peterson was running for retention in Gunnison, Manti, Moroni and Mt. Pleasant City courts.

For Gunnison City Justice Court retention, Peterson took 77.33 percent of the popular vote, for 6,065 votes to retain in total. In Manti, he took 77.07 percent of the yes votes, for a total of 6,016 votes to retain. In Moroni City, Peterson was retained with 76.40 percent of the popular vote, which made 5,879 votes for retention. Mt. Pleasant City retained Peterson as justice court judge with 76.67 percent of the votes, 6,032 popular votes to retain.

Since he began working as a justice court judge in Sanpete County in 2000, Peterson has served as justice court judge for Manti, Ephraim, Fairview, Fountain Green, Gunnison, Mt. Pleasant and Spring City.

Peterson announced he would be retiring from several of the cities earlier this year. Fairview, Fountain Green and Spring City are the most recent examples of Sanpete cities looking to fill the position Peterson left open when he decided to retire.

Judge Paul Lyman was voted to be retained as the Sixth District Juvenile Court Judge by a margin of 81.42 percent of the popular vote. In total, he received 17,942 votes to be retained in the counties that make up the Sixth District court system: Sanpete, Garfield, Piute, Kane, Sevier and Wayne counties.

Lyman earned a law degree from he University of Chicago Law School in 1979. He ran a private practice and also served as part-time Deputy Sevier County Attorney, Wayne County Attorney and Salina City Attorney.

Lyman was also elected mayor of Richfield from 1994 to 1998 and was on Richfield City Council from 1989 to 1994. In 2000, he was appointed Sixth District Juvenile Court Judge by Gov. Michael Leavitt.

Halloween 2016 Photographs
Kate and Susan Murdoch (holding dog) are both garbed in spot-on Star Wars regalia and accompanied by their Ewok "Missy" during Manti's Trunk or Treat event on Monday - Robert Stevens / Messenger photo

Kate and Susan Murdoch (holding dog) are both garbed in spot-on Star Wars regalia and accompanied by their Ewok “Missy” during Manti’s Trunk or Treat event on Monday – Robert Stevens / Messenger photo

This crossing guard smiles from behind a painted face during the Mt. Pleasant Halloween parade.

This crossing guard smiles from behind a painted face during the Mt. Pleasant Halloween parade.

 

A possible Pocahontas astride a pony in the Moroni Elementary Halloween parade on Monday. - Daniela Vazquez / Messenger photo

A possible Pocahontas astride a pony in the Moroni Elementary Halloween parade on Monday. – Daniela Vazquez / Messenger photo

 

This man at Manti's Trunk or Treat is a walking malpractice suit.

This man at Manti’s Trunk or Treat is a walking malpractice suit.

 

Mrs. Mary Curl leads her fifth grade class in their parade clad as Cruella de Vil. - Daniela Vazquez / Messenger photo

Mrs. Mary Curl leads her fifth grade class in their parade clad as Cruella de Vil. – Daniela Vazquez / Messenger photo

 

Omri (left) Keaton (center) and Davian Rogers line up at the Trunk or Treat event hosted by Gunnison Market Halloween night. - Robert Stevens / Messenger photo

Omri (left) Keaton (center) and Davian Rogers line up at the Trunk or Treat event hosted by Gunnison Market Halloween night. – Robert Stevens / Messenger photo

 

The Mt. Pleasant Elementary school parade had some costumed attendees. Pictured from left to right are Heather and Presley Seely, and Whitney and Gracie Colby. - Robert Stevens ? Messenger photo

The Mt. Pleasant Elementary school parade had some costumed attendees. Pictured from left to right are Heather and Presley Seely, and Whitney and Gracie Colby. – Robert Stevens ? Messenger photo