Archives for August 2016

District revises cyber bullying policy

Daniela Vazquez

Staff Writer

8-25-2016

 

MT. PLEASANT—The North Sanpete School Board has revised a rule on cyber bullying in the high school student handbook to give a lot more detail about what type of language is “prohibited.”

The school board modified the rule after 50-plus parents and other citizens signed a letter drafted by a California First Amendment attorney.

The letter, dated Aug. 5, and addressed to Superintendent Sam Ray contended that any attempt to “restrict” or “punish” speech was a violation of free-speech rights in the First Amendment to the U.S. Constitution. And it demanded revisions to the rule before school started.

The revised rule, approved at a school board meeting Tuesday, Aug. 16, retains a statement that “administration reserves the right to restrict any individual from attending a school-sponsored event” if the person has engaged in any behavior that “causes material and substantial disruption within the school…”

But unlike the original rule, the new policy doesn’t specify that parents or students who post malicious remarks in social media will be barred from two home athletic contests.

The new language, drafted with the guidance of a school district attorney, states, “It is the intent of this provision (policy) to encourage civil discourse in the school community and to help students of the district learn to communicate their disagreements with respect and decorum.

The policy adds, “Credible threats of violence against school employees or students, harassment, bullying or cyber-bulling…and malicious lies or smear campaigns, no matter the forum or medium, are prohibited.”

During the school board meeting, Superintendent Ray said the request to add a rule on cyber bullying to the student handbook came from coaches at North Sanpete High School, who reported reading an outpouring of degrading posts from both parents and students on social media sites.

The original stated called for denying a student or parent access to two home games if  either engaged in cyber-bullying.

About 10 patrons opposed to the original handbook rule appeared at the school board meeting.

“We don’t want to ban anyone from our events, certainly not our community members,” Superintendent Ray told people at the board meeting. “But we do have a professional and ethical obligation to protect students from bullying.”

“We’re not trying to do anything egregious,” Rich Brotherson, school board president, told parents. “If you’ve got any ideas on how to control this, offer them.”

“I keep coming back to reinforcing the positive,” Jamie Webb of Spring City, a parent,  said. “Legally, there is nothing you can do to enforce or punish the negative.”

Webb suggested educating people, and “rallying around those who need support,” could create a domino effect against cyber bullying.

Mark Hightower of Mt. Pleasant said he was neither in support nor opposition to the new policy, although has concerns with the current version.

Hightower said he has a child who was “victimized” and “humiliated” through bullying last year using a school app and social media sites.

“This can’t be tolerated and punishment must be carried out case-by-case because it’s our experience that there is no one-size-fits all zero tolerance policy,” he said.

“A student doesn’t need a scarlet letter painted on them, possibly affecting the remainder of their school years.”

At the same time, Hightower said he wanted to encourage the board to do the “right thing” constitutionally.

Ray noted that a technology handbook given to all students already talks about cyber-bulling, including offering a definition of cyber-bullying, describing types of cyber-bullying, and the expressing the district’s position on cyber-bullying and digital citizenship.

The technology handbook encourages parents and students to report any incident of cyber-bullying to school personnel immediately, and to remember all digital activities using school property are monitored and retained.

The handbook says engaging in such activity will result in the students “loss of academic and/or school privileges, and may result in referral to law enforcement.”

Ray said the district is reaching out to other districts for insight and to get clear examples so it can achieve its goals of stopping cyber bullying.

“We want the best for our kids,” Brotherson said. “It’s not an easy balance.”

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Centerfield gives ‘broad approval’ for interlocal police force proposal

 

Megan Batterman

Staff writer

8-25-2016

 

A proposed interlocal agreement between three communities in the Gunnison Valley has been drafted and, at least in one community, put to a public hearing.

On Wednesday, Aug. 3, residents in Centerfield gathered to express opinions about a proposal to unify the police forces of that community with Gunnison and Mayfield. Centerfield Police Chief Brett McCall said the proposal was met with broad approval in Centerfield.

Gunnison will be holding a similar public hearing in the next few weeks. Trent Halliday, the police chief in that city, said he believes that the proposal will be met with approval there, too.

McCall and Halliday attended a city council meeting in Mayfield on Wednesday, Aug. 10 to discuss with the council exactly what the interlocal agreement will entail.

Halliday told the council, “Both of our departments have responded to emergency calls in Mayfield and that will continue, regardless.”

He went on to explain how the agreement would affect Mayfield, and how much coverage the town would be getting.

According to the agreement, which is still in the rough draft stages, the new unified police force would have, at minimum, two shifts, seven days a week, with at least one officer proactively patrolling and being visible.

Halliday explained to the council that in smaller communities there is more opportunity to commit crime because of the lack of dedicated law enforcement presence in the area. Halliday feels that having a unified police force may help crack down on petty crime in the area.

The agreement does not, however, state specific times in which the officer would be patrolling each area, something that Halliday believes will act as a further deterrent because police could show up at any time.

“We just work all the areas as they need worked,” Halliday said. “There is no sense in putting strict time limits on it.”

McCall agreed.

“Boundaries and borders do not exist in law enforcement,” he said. “Wherever our calls are, we go, and we know our communities well enough that we have a good baseline with how to police each area.”

Mayor John Christensen, who invited the two chiefs, reiterated the point to his council. Christensen, who boasts 40 years of law enforcement experience, said, “Law enforcement is a brotherhood. If an officer needs help, we respond.”

Both Halliday and McCall cautioned the council that the solution isn’t a one-size-fits-all fix for the communities. The needs of each community will be taken into consideration.

The unified force, if approved, will be governed by a seven person board composed of the mayors of each community and citizens who reside in each town, along with the new police chief for the unified force.

McCall spoke passionately about the unification, something he believes will serve to further quell crime in Sanpete County.

“This is what we think is right for Gunnison Valley right now,” he said. “We know that one of us, or each of us, may be out of a job soon (as chief), but this is the right thing to do.”

Councilwoman Malynda Bjerregaard, who sent out a poll among constituents in Mayfield last month, disagreed. She said the poll she conducted revealed residents of Mayfield are strongly opposed to unification.

Bjerregaard said current law enforcement methods work “just fine.” She asked McCall and Halliday to explain any differences in coverage between the Sanpete County Sheriff’s Office, which currently provides police coverage for Mayfield, and the proposed unified police force.

“You don’t get much out of the county,” McCall responded. “I worked for the county for ten years. We would react to Mayfield, but we would not patrol here.”

McCall assured the council that it is not the intent of officers to swarm Mayfield and write tickets for every possible offense. He explained, “It’s an education process. That’s just law enforcement.”

A public hearing to discuss the interlocal agreement has been scheduled for Wednesday, Aug. 31 at 7 p.m. at the Mayfield City Hall. Christensen encouraged residents of Mayfield to participate and have their voices heard.

Halliday and McCall said they would attend the meeting.

Fire departments from all across the county scramble during the ladder race portion of the Fireman's Challenge during the Sanpete County Fair on Saturday, Aug. 20. In the end, the Wales and Manti fire departments each won three challenges. The Manti department was the winner of the final challenge.

Fire departments from all across the county scramble during the ladder race portion of the Fireman’s Challenge during the Sanpete County Fair on Saturday, Aug. 20. In the end, the Wales and Manti fire departments each won three challenges. The Manti department was the winner of the final challenge. – Robert Stevens / Messenger photo

 

Fireman’s Challenge, cookoff, and cornhole tourney get Sanpete County Fair rolling

Robert Stevens

Managing Editor

8-25-2016

 

MANTI—The Sanpete County Fair started building steam last weekend with events such as the Fireman’s Challenge, Dutch Oven Cookoff, cornhole tournament and Junior Rodeo drawing crowds and competitors.

The popular “Fireman’s Challenge” event, held last Saturday, Aug. 20, featured a hotly contested battle between Wales and Manti fire departments in which both teams won three events. But the Manti City Fire Department won the final challenge.

“The event went really well this year, and attendance was great,” said Wade Anderson, Sterling fire fighter, who chaired the challenge.

The Dutch Oven Cook-off took place on Aug. 20 as well. Matt Reber of Axtell took first-place in the “main dish” competition, Roy Carlisle of Manti took second place and Jaydee Miller took third place.

In the “side dish” category, Tom Anderson of Gunnison took  first place, Levi Reber of Axtell took second place, and Jason Pipes of Mt. Pleasant took third place.

Mike Bennett of Mayfield (also the chairman of the whole fair) took first place in the dessert competition,  with Laini Reber of Axtell coming in second.

The cornhole tournament  took place on Aug. 20, too, with excellent attendance according to Davis Hayes, of Ephraim, who organized the tournament.

Buck Buford and Kerry Carver, both of Ephriam, were the tournament winners.

“It was wonderful,” Hayes said. “We had tons of people show up, with 14 different teams playing, and I don’t know how many spectators turned out. We have had a lot of tournaments over the years and this was by far the best one, with participants ranging in age from 5 years old to 70.”

The Junior Rodeo was held on Friday, and went off without a hitch, according to organizer Zane Osborne of Manti.

“It turned out really great,” he said. “I want to thank everyone who helped make it happen, from the ladies who took registrations to the guys who worked the chutes. Overall things went fantastic.”

 

 

The mutton bustin' portion of the Junior Rodeo have little ones hanging on for dear life as their bucking sheep tear out the chute and into the rodeo grounds.

The mutton bustin’ portion of the Junior Rodeo have little ones hanging on for dear life as their bucking sheep tear out the chute and into the rodeo grounds.

Buck Buford (left) and Kerry Carver hold up their $300 prize check after winning the cornhole tournament at the Sanpete County Fair last weekend.

Buck Buford (left) and Kerry Carver hold up their $300 prize check after winning the cornhole tournament at the Sanpete County Fair last weekend. – Photo courtesy Davis Hayes

 

These teachers are putting on art classes at the Fairview Museum this fall. From left are Claudia Fossum of Fairview, Claudette Woods of Moroni, Wendy Hacking of Mt. Pleasant, and Valerie Howcroft, and Nancy Miner, both of Fairview.

These teachers are putting on art classes at the Fairview Museum this fall. From left are Claudia Fossum of Fairview, Claudette Woods of Moroni, Wendy Hacking of Mt. Pleasant, and Valerie Howcroft, and Nancy Miner, both of Fairview.

 

Fairview adding ‘a little color’ to classes, courtesy of museum artists

 

Matt Harris

Staff writer

8-25-2016

 

FAIRVIEW—Fairview will add a little color to its lifestyle with new art classes coming soon, sponsored by the Fairview Museum.

The Fairview Museum has long had the goal of bringing art and music education into the community through outreach programs, and this is another example.

A number of Sanpete County artists will help teach the classes, including prominent artist Gian Ferrari, who will teach a class called “Drawing and the Basics of Art through Different Media,” beginning Tuesday, Sept. 13.

Other topics and instructors include  watercolor with Wendy Hacking, oil painting with Marie Lindahl, and drawing, also with Ferrari.

For more information, call the museum at 427-9421, or the teachers themselves.  Wendy Hacking may be reached at (435) 469-2184; Gian Ferrari is at (435) 229-1199; and Marie Lindahl’s number is 462-3640.

Classes are held in the newly renovated classrooms of the Horizon (Mammoth) Building in the basement. Supplies for classes may be purchased at the museum gift shop.

Ted Olsen (center) holds an award for 35 year of service on the board of the Utah Association of Municipal Power Systems (UAMPS). On his left is current UAAMPS board chairwoman Jackie Flowers, and on his right, Douglas Hunter, the operation’s general manager.

Ted Olsen (center) holds an award for 35 year of service on the board of the Utah Association of Municipal Power Systems (UAMPS). On his left is current UAAMPS board chairwoman Jackie Flowers, and on his right, Douglas Hunter, the operation’s general manager.

Ted Olson honored for 35 years of service in UAMPS

 

Matt Harris

Staff writer

8-25-2016

 

EPHRAIM— Ted Olsen, longtime local and state leader in the area of municipal power operations, has received a special service award from the Utah Associated Municipal Power Systems (UAMPS) for 35 years of service on the UAAMPS board, including time as board chairman.

The award was presented Monday at the 21st annual UAMPS member conference in Midway.

Olsen has worked with UAMPS since its inception in 1980. During his 35 years on the UAAMPS board, he helped oversee construction of several large power plants serving municipal power companies around the Intermountain West.

In 1987, Olsen was appointed treasurer for the UAAMPS board. He served in that position until 1993. He served as vice chairman from 1999-2001 and chairman form 2002-04.

Meanwhile, he served six years as chairman of the board of the Intermountain Power Agency, the company that owns the Intermountain Power Project (IPP) outside Delta, one of the largest power plants in the United States.

“To me, this award indicates a time for reflection,” Olsen says. “Things have certainly changed. The evolution of the company has been unbelievable.”

Olsen has represented the city of Ephraim all his time on the UAMPS board. In addition, he has served on the Ephraim City Utilities Board for 38 years.

“It’s been an honor to represent Ephraim all this time,” Olsen says, “and it’s wonderful to know that (Ephraim) has secure power now and in the future.”

UAMPS is a political subdivision of the state of Utah that provides wholesale electric energy, on a nonprofit basis, to community-owned power systems throughout the Intermountain West.

UAMPS represents 45 cities in Utah, California, Idaho, Nevada, New Mexico, Oregon and Wyoming.

 

L. Rawlin Bagnall, new District Executive for the Arapeen District Boy Scouts of America.

L. Rawlin Bagnall, new District Executive for the Arapeen District Boy Scouts of America.

 

Sanpete native returns as Scout executive in Arapeen District

 

Daniela Vazquez

Staff writer

8-25-2016
 

EPHRAIM—After several years of demonstrating success through his volunteer efforts, L. Rawlin Bagnall III was named the new district executive for the Arapeen District by the Utah National Parks Council, Boy Scouts of America.

“I am honored and excited to be returning home to Sanpete County,” Bagnall said of his return home from Las Vegas, NV on Aug. 1. “As I transition into this role, I am committed to continuing to support the legacy of leadership laid by generations of Scouters in the area, who have impacted countless youth.”

The council said it took months of working through the selection process, but because Bagnall had impacted several districts including Snow Canyon, Zion, Cedar Breaks and Bryce Canyon, they felt he should lead the Apareen District which services Sanpete, Sevier, Wayne and portions of Garfield Counties.

Bagnall said all the awards and recognitions under his belt are because of a passion to serve and see how it impacts young people, and not something he sought.

“The real thing is when you impact young people,” Bagnall told the Messenger, “and you see how the program impacts them, it just gets you more excited and you want to keep doing it.”

Leaders have said his innovative program development, logo-branding, and staff development have also impacted Thunder Ridge, Maple Dell and Beaver High Adventure base, and leaders have said his efforts are still felt 20 years later.

He recounted a memory from 1999 when he and Field Director Jim Bethel were in the Maple Dell district.

“When we heard the staff talking about their experience and leadership, it was incredible,” he said. “What they didn’t realize is even though they were young, their example impacted us as leaders and that’s neat to have. We knocked it out of the park.”

Because of his achievements, Bagnall is no stranger to receiving awards. He has been the recipient of several BSA awards, including Eagle Scout Order of the Arrow (OA), Wood Badge, District Award of Merit and Tu-Cubin Noonie OA Lodge Council Service, and through a strong interest in the outdoors, he has served as the Assistant Camp Director and member of summer camp staff for almost 10 years.

Demonstrating his leadership skills early, Bagnall served as the Snow College Student Body President before he graduated. Later, he earned a masters degree in education from Southern Utah University, and went on to earn a doctorate from the University of Nevada, Las Vegas in International and Multicultural relations.

“I am confident that [Bagnall] will excel,” Dr. David Bonner, former district executive and current manager of LDS Philanthropies at BYU, said. “Because I saw him excel in the rain and the snow and cold while surrounded by hundreds of ‘wired’ twelve- to fourteen-year-old Boy Scouts…I trust him.”

Bagnall’s seat is held under District Chair Reed Rawlings and District Commissioner Brent White. The trio makes up the ‘Key Three,’ the organizations highest level of leadership on a district level.

Bagnall, son of Vivian Kosan Bagnall of Ephraim and the late Lewis Rawlin Bagnall, Jr. He is the grandson of the late Utahna Jensen Bagnall and Lewis Rawlin Bagnall of Ephraim. Although he can be considered a fourth-generation Ephraim resident, he spent time In Montana, and graduated from Billings Senior High in 1987 after a move his family made for his father’s work.

After high school, Bagnall enlisted in the U.S. Marines, and later served a two year mission in Tuxtla, Gutierrez, Mexico.

Throughout the years he’s traveled to various places in Wisconsin and North Carolina, before going to graduate school in Nevada.

“I can’t tell you how excited I am to be to be back in the community and the valley,” he said. “When this opportunity to take the position, I jumped on it. I just love being back home.”

 

 

 

Mayfield lifts business license moratorium, but limits conditional use permits instead

 

Megan Batterman

Staff writer

8-25-2016

 

MAYFIELD—The town of Mayfield is lifting a moratorium placed on business licenses last month and instead placing a moratorium on conditional use permits.

Malynda Bjerregaard, who serves on the town board, said the change will give people looking to run a home business an opportunity to get a business license. It will still prohibit licenses for businesses looking to locate in any other type of building, including a shed or garage.

Bjerregaard said the moratorium will remain in place for an “indefinite” period of time while the town works on updating its general plan.

“We’ve got to redo our zoning ordinances,” she said while explaining that the state of Utah is trying to get communities to move away from issuing conditional use permits. Instead, municipalities should have sophisticated zoning ordinances that can anticipate and provide space for various types of development.

Mayfield currently has just one zone represented in its municipal boundaries, meaning that all prospective businesses have had to apply for conditional use permits. Currently there are 12 general use permits in town.

But according to town recorder Catherine Bartholomew, before the economic recession in 2008, up to 20 small businesses in Mayfield held conditional use permits.

Bjerregaard, who acts as a liaison between the town board, and the planning and zoning commission, said that a forthcoming public hearing will give residents of Mayfield an opportunity to voice concerns and actively participate in the general planning process. A date for the hearing has not been scheduled.

In addition to the public hearing, Bjerregaard said, the planning commission and the  town board will look at zoning ordinances in several other small towns to see what could work in Mayfield.

Klarissa Shaffer and Tanner Wilkinson

Klarissa Shaffer and Tanner Wilkinson

 

Klarissa Shaffer will marry her best friend, Tanner Wilkinson, on Friday, Sept. 2, 2016 in the Manti Utah Temple.

The bride’s parents are Shane and Lori Shaffer of Ephraim, Utah.  The groom’s parents are Scott and Sheryl Wilkinson, also from Ephraim, Utah.

Tanner and Klarissa are both graduates of Manti High School.  A reception will be held in their honor that evening at the YSA Church, 83 North 100 East in Ephraim, from 6-8:30 p.m., and dancing will begin at 7:30 p.m.

If you have not received an invitation, please accept this as such.  The bride and groom will attend Snow College for a year before heading to BYU.

Kosta Dinos Salamanopoulos, son of Athanassios (Saki) and Shelley Salamanopoulos of North Las Vegas, has been called to serve in the Japan Tokyo South Mission of The Church of Jesus Christ of Latter-day Saints. He reports to the Provo Missionary Training Center on Oct. 26, 2016. Kosta is an Eagle Scout, four year Seminary graduate, and received an advanced honors diploma from Legacy High School in North Las Vegas. Kosta is the grandson of the late Anastassios Salamanopoulos and Marina Salamanopoulos of Komotini, Greece; and Lilburn and Loy Deskins of Gunnison.

Kosta Dinos Salamanopoulos

 

Kosta Kinos Salamanopoulos – Japan Tokyo South Mission

 

Kosta Dinos Salamanopoulos, son of Athanassios (Saki) and Shelley Salamanopoulos of North Las Vegas, has been called to serve in the Japan Tokyo South Mission of The Church of Jesus Christ of Latter-day Saints.
He reports to the Provo Missionary Training Center on Oct. 26, 2016.
Kosta is an Eagle Scout, four year Seminary graduate, and received an advanced honors diploma from Legacy High School in North Las Vegas.
Kosta is the grandson of the late Anastassios Salamanopoulos and Marina Salamanopoulos of Komotini, Greece; and Lilburn and Loy Deskins of Gunnison.

Four boys received the rank of Eagle Scout in Troop, Team and Post 1642, sponsored by the LDS Mt. Pleasant 5th Ward. From left to right: Jacob Sparks, Tom Jones, Ben Andersen and Simon Quinn. Hats off to Loyce Schuhmann, who, as the Eagle Scout finisher for the past 10 years, has been instrumental in helping many scouts achieve this rank.

Four boys received the rank of Eagle Scout in Troop, Team and Post 1642, sponsored by the LDS Mt. Pleasant 5th Ward.
From left to right: Jacob Sparks, Tom Jones, Ben Andersen and Simon Quinn.
Hats off to Loyce Schuhmann, who, as the Eagle Scout finisher for the past 10 years, has been instrumental in helping many scouts achieve this rank.

Mabel Hiett

Mabel Hiett

 

Mabel Steel (Small) Hiett, 99, passed away on Aug. 16, 2016 at her daughter’s home in New Harmony, Utah, surrounded by all of her children.

The youngest of seven children, Mabel was born on June 3, 1917, in Red Mesa, Colorado, to the late Benjamin and Tryphena Willden Steele.

Mabel’s heritage was rich with pioneer ancestry, and she lived her life with the determination and passion of those early ancestors.  Her great-great grandfather, Charles Willden, was one of the ambitious settlers of South Central Utah, and built the original Fort Willden on the northeast corner across the street where the old Cove Fort is today, which he also helped to build.

She was a lifelong devoted member of The Church of Jesus Christ of Latter-day Saints.  She was married to Ulysse Alby Small on June 28, 1936 and subsequently raised five daughters within that faith.     Mabel was a skilled homemaker and after she and her husband left their ranching endeavors in the early 1960s, she established many “mini” households throughout Southern Utah to accommodate her husband’s mining profession while she finished raising her children.

Mabel held many positions in the auxiliaries of the church, and was especially fond of the children in the Primary organization, and the Young Women.  She was a great lover of music and encouraged the musical talents of her daughters throughout their lives.

He award-winning yards and gardens were celebrated places of great beauty, and she was especially skilled at raising “cosmos that smile.”  She had a great love for literature and was a sensitive,  prolific writer.  All of her children are lucky recipients of her beautiful letters and poetry.

After the passing of her husband in January 1994, Mabel was fortunate to be courted by her high school sweetheart, and was married to Clifford Hiett on May 24, 1994.  They were happily married for over 15 years until his death in June, 2010.

She is the mother of five daughters;  Peggy (Mike) Segle; Patsy (Kent) Brooks; Twila Small; Tresa (Mike) Wadsworth; and Melanee (Martin) Dulfon.  She was the grandmother of 20 grandchildren, 56 great-grandchildren and seven great-great-grandchildren.

Services for Mabel were held at the Southern Utah Mortuary on Saturday, Aug. 20, 2016.  She was laid to rest in the Cedar City Cemetery.

The family wishes to gratefully acknowledge the dedicated assistance of Intermountain  Health Care and Hospice Service for their compassionate care of our loved one during her final days.

Emily Cook Dyches (1976-2016). - Photo courtesy Ginnie Johnson

Emily Cook Dyches (1976-2016). – Photo courtesy Ginnie Johnson

 

High school volleyball game dedicated to raise funds for ‘The Emily Effect’

 

Daniela Vazquez

Staff writer

10-25-2016

 

MT. PLEASANT—The North Sanpete and Manti High volleyball teams are face off tonight but they will stand united to raise awareness and money for what is being called “The Emily Effect.”

The Emily Effect is a campaign that has grown out of the death of Emily Cook Dyches, who grew up in Moroni and graduated from North Sanpete.

Emily Dyches died earlier this year when she apparently jumped out of a moving car and jumped into the path of traffic on I-15 outside Nephi. Her family attributes her death to post-partum depression. The goal of the Emily Effect campaign is to raise awareness of the condition.

Emily married her North Sanpete High School sweetheart, Eric Dyches. Over the years, they had five children, and according to Eric, Emily was an “affectionate and attentive mother,” although he noticed pronounced changes in her mood after the birth of their fifth child.

The couple sought professional help and shortly after, Emily was diagnosed with post-partum depression (PPD), depression suffered by a mother after the birth of a child due to a combination of hormonal changes, fatigue and the psychological adjustment to motherhood. She was also suffering from anxiety.

Following Emily’s tragic death, Eric became inspired to share his wife’s story, and with the help of Emily’s younger sister, Megan Johnson, The Emily Effect was born.

Rickie Stewart, long time friend of Emily and North Sanpete’s head volleyball coach, said each year she tries to get her girls involved in community service.

As this year’s season began, she reached out to Eric Dyches and Johnson to see if  her girls could be useful in the Emily Effect effort. The result is the volleyball match-up against Manti.

“Manti is close to home,” Johnson said about choosing Manti as the competing team. “And a lot of people there knew and loved Emily.”

The game will be held tonight at North Sanpete at 6:30 p.m.

T-shirts in the North Sanpete and Manti school colors will be available for sale, with the proceeds going toward the campaign. Regular T-shirts will be sold for $12 and baseball style T-shirts will be sold for $15.

Because the shirts are decorated in each of the schools’ colors, Johnson hopes they will be worn outside of the event as a way to spread awareness of The Emily Effect and as a form of insignia wear for the two Sanpete County schools.

North Sanpete High student body officers will be available to collect donations throughout the stands, and information about the campaign will be presented over the loud speaker during game breaks.

Last night, Johnson gave a talk to female athletes and their mothers at North Sanpete High to educate girls about mental health disorders and how to get help.

“This can happen to anyone.” Johnson said. “We need to educate our youth and spread awareness that [mood disorders] do happen.”

For more information about Emily’s story, to donate to the cause, or to read stories from other mothers and families who have experienced PPD, visit theemilyeffect.org.

 

The logo of the Emily Effect campaign will appear T-shirts being sold at the North-Sanpete volleyball game tonight. Proceeds will go to the Emily Effect campaign.

The logo of the Emily Effect campaign will appear T-shirts being sold at the North-Sanpete volleyball game tonight. Proceeds will go to the Emily Effect campaign.

 

Nearly 200 young athletes from North Sanpete High have joined together to form the North Sanpete Service Squad. Their first project was to renovate the stadium, giving it a much needed mini facelift.

Nearly 200 young athletes from North Sanpete High have joined together to form the North Sanpete Service Squad. Their first project was to renovate the stadium, giving it a much needed mini facelift. – Photo courtesy Sydney Wilkey

 

North Sanpete students swing into service by repainting stadium

Daniela Vazquez

Staff writer

8-25-2016

 

MT. PLEASANT—Three North Sanpete High sports teams have united as one to form the North Sanpete High (NSH) Service Squad in an effort to give back to their school and the community.

The cheerleaders wanted to find ways to give back through acts of service, and said they would start by giving the stadium a mini facelift.

News about the facelift traveled to other teams, cheerleading coach Syndi Wilkey told the Messenger. The girls on the volleyball team asked how they could have a hand in the effort, and the football players offered to help kick off the event. Thus, the NSH Service Squad was born.

“This is such a great thing for the school and it gives us such a great boost,” Principal Nan Ault said. “It’s good for kids to take on responsibility.”

In the past, people in the audience complained of an overload of school pride coming from students in the stands creating an uncomfortable environment for visitors, cheerleading coach Syndi Wilkey told the Messenger.

To solve the issue, students created a blueprint to include sectioned-off seating areas for students based on paint color.

The center section is painted white and meant for students. Although the section is available for anyone to sit in, students ask that anyone who occupies the area remember that bursts of high energy are a common occurrence on game day.

The remaining sections were painted red, and the announcer’s booth and concession stands also received a fresh coat of paint.

Artisit and NSH alumni Lesa Thomas volunteered to paint the fine details throughout the stadium, such as the mascot and lettering on the announcer’s booth. For Thomas, being a “Hawk” doesn’t end after graduation.

“I think the Service Squad is a great idea,” Thomas said. “I’m volunteering my efforts because I wouldn’t be who I am today if it weren’t for the influential people who volunteered on my behalf when I was a young Hawk.”

The cheerleaders said they planned on paying for the project, but Ault said, “The school would fund the project if the kids did the work.”

The work was extended to cleaning up surface debris and pulling weeds around the stadium grounds, and the work was completed in a single night.

The volleyball players said they purchased NSH Service Squad T-shirts to give the newly formed team a feel of unity.

“It’s hard for everyone to get things done, so we need some help,” Ault said. “We appreciate the help and we’ve got some great advisors.”

The entire project is due to be completed by Thursday, ending with the detail painting by Thomas.

 

North Sanpete High alumni and artist Lesa Thomas volunteered to paint the fine details in the Hawk stadium. - Photo courtesy Cami Hathaway

North Sanpete High alumni and artist Lesa Thomas volunteered to paint the fine details in the Hawk stadium. – Photo courtesy Cami Hathaway

 

 

Manti High students board buses, ride bikes and walk home after the bell dismisses them for the day.

Manti High students board buses, ride bikes and walk home after the bell dismisses them for the day. – Daniela Vazquez / Messenger photo

 

Transportation safety is big deal at start of school

Daniela Vasquez

Staff writer

8-25-2016

 

As the school year beings, transporting children to and from school is a concern for everyone from school district leaders to parents to drivers.

Students walk, ride bikes and skate boards, get rides from parents or friends, and many ride school busses.

With school back in session, South Sanpete School District transportation director Ralph Squire said the biggest issue bus drivers face is drivers who fail to heed the yellow and red light signals on the arms of busses.

“Yellow means slow down, and proceed using due caution, and don’t travel more than 20 miles per hour,” Squire said. “Red means to stop immediately before reaching the bus, and do not proceed.”

South Sanpete School District’s 28 busses travel approximately 1,275 miles per school day, and more than 229,420 miles per year.

In the North Sanpete School District, 25 buses travel 1,396 miles per day, equivalent to 248,517 miles per year.

Squire said the greatest risk students face is when they are boarding or leaving the bus, not while riding in it.

“When it comes to school busses, please follow the rules,” Squire said. “Please slow down and follow traffic and safety rules in school zones, and please don’t be in a hurry wherever students might be present.”

Another issue South Sanpete School District faces is vehicles pulling in and out of the school bus zones in front of schools where the line of sight is poor. According to Squire, when picking up students, park in designated zones and never pull into the bus zone.

The North Sanpete School District has created a district policy outlining transportation goals, with the top goal being the safety of students, followed by proper training of school bus drivers.

Squire said no child in the South Sanpete District has ever been harmed while on a school buss, and riding the school bus has historically been the safest way to get to and from school.

 

 

 

Gunnison Valley High's quarterback Kris Edwards sends a pass flying during the Bulldogs’ 40-6 victory against the Wayne Badgers.

Gunnison Valley High’s quarterback Kris Edwards sends a pass flying during the Bulldogs’ 40-6 victory against the Wayne Badgers. – Tiffanie Jackson / Messenger photo

 

Bulldogs blast into Wayne with 40-6 win last Friday

Robert Stevens

Managing editor

8-25-2016
 

GUNNISON—Gunnison Valley High’s varsity football team had a killer season opener, blasting the Wayne Badgers, 40-6, on Friday, Aug. 19.

The game started out rough for Wayne. The first quarter was a total shutout, with Gunnison’s returning running back Kyler White making a 90-yard kick return and teammate Mike Hansen catching a 10-yard touchdown pass from starting quarterback Kris Edwards.

Edwards contributed a lot to Gunnison Valley’s scoreboard, throwing  four touchdowns during the game.  Overall, Edwards completed 381 yards passing.

White scored three times, twice on pass completions and once rushing. He contributed to the defense as well, making three sacks.

The Badgers scored only once when they got a touchdown in the second quarter. But they failed to make the extra point and stayed at six points until the end-game buzzer.

The Bulldogs play North Sevier at home tomorrow at 7 p.m. and then face Kanab on Friday, Sept. 2.

 

Snow College Defensive Line Coach Fred Taukei'aho watches as Badgers practice their defensive tackle - Robert Stevens / Messenger photo

Snow College Defensive Line Coach Fred Taukei’aho watches as Badgers practice their defensive tackle – Robert Stevens / Messenger photo

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