Archives for October 2016

Columnist Corrie Lynne Player

Columnist Corrie Lynne Player

Optimism is more comfortable than pessimism

 

Corrie Lynne Player

Columnist

10-20-2016

 

Are you an optimist or a pessimist? Do you see the glass as half empty or half full? How you perceive the world will affect whether or not you can be happy no matter what happens around you.
Research shows that happy people live longer, healthier lives, have more energy, and enjoy better relationships. People who are more positive in the way they approach problems have fewer accidents, less drug dependency, and fewer divorces, and illnesses.
Numerous studies have bourne out these facts, but you don’t have to read scientific journals to realize that being happy feels a lot better than being angry, sad, or guilty.
Dr. Ellia Gourgouris, a clinical psychologist, said, “Depression, sadness, and unhappiness in general deplete you of energy, like you have this leak in your system…. Happiness not only plugs up that leak but begins to build up a reserve.”
Happiness is a choice, not something that is bestowed on you. I’ve discovered that the best way to be happy and optimistic is to perform acts of kindness. You will not only feel happy when you do something nice, but you will spread a bit of happiness to those who witness your
kindness, as well as to the recipient of your acts.
I’ve seen so many kindnesses, like the man who noticed that the carton of milk an elderly woman tried to put on her walker kept falling off. He not only picked it up for her, he rearranged the groceries in her basket to solve the problem.
I was behind a handicapped man who was struggling to find enough change to pay for his bread and juice; the person at the end of the line stepped forward and handed the clerk $10, then walked quickly away.
I’ve discovered a couple of sure-fire ways to lift my mood. When I’m in a long line at the movies, super market, or etc, I invite the person behind me to go first. That inevitably makes me feel good or even sparks a pleasant conversation—and it’s much better than shifting from foot to foot and sighing with impatience.
Sometimes I’ve told someone about a compliment I overheard about them, and enjoyed the smiles. I, too, smiled when one of his teachers told me that my 14-year-old son had bragged to a group of friends that his mom and dad were his heroes. I remembered that warm feeling the next time that 14-year-old sulked in his room or argued with his sister.
In past columns, I’ve asked you to share your ideas for spreading happiness. I’ve collected several. One woman sent an email saying that she enjoys slipping a gas card into someone’s shopping bag, especially when she can do so without being noticed.
Another reader said that she writes a note to the manager of the restaurant or retail store where she’s received good service.
Several of you mentioned your appreciation when your neighbor took your trash to the curb or mowed your lawn. I have a neighbor who’s done this for me several times. And I can’t count how many times somebody has plowed my driveway or shoveled my walks.
Kindness can be spontaneous or planned. Just thinking about it can lift your mood and turn a gray day to sunshine.

This 19th Century oolite stone home in the northwest part of Manti won the 2016 Reader Remodel Contest sponsored by This Old House Magazine. The magazine is an offshoot of the former PBS show by the same name. - Photo courtesy Mark Lohman

This 19th Century oolite stone home in the northwest part of Manti won the 2016 Reader Remodel Contest sponsored by This Old House Magazine. The magazine is an offshoot of the former PBS show by the same name. – Photo courtesy Mark Lohman

 

[Read more…]

The documentary "Splinters of a Nation: German Prisoners of War in Utah" will be screened at the Casino Star Theatre tonight at 7 p.m. before it goes on to air on KUED. Filmmaker G. Scott Porter (shown in inset box) and Ken Verdoia of KUED-TV will answer questions after the screening.

The documentary “Splinters of a Nation: German Prisoners of War in Utah” will be screened at the Casino Star Theatre tonight at 7 p.m. before it goes on to air on KUED. Filmmaker G. Scott Porter (shown in inset box) and Ken Verdoia of KUED-TV will answer questions after the screening.

Free documentary ‘Splinters of a Nation’ shows treatment of German POWs in Utah

 

Robert Stevens

Managing editor

10-20-2016

 

GUNNISON—The Casino Star Theatre will offer an advance showing of a public TV documentary that highlights Utah’s experience housing German prisoners-of-war (POW) in communities throughout the state during World War II.

The screening of “Splinters of a Nation: German Prisoners of War in Utah” will be tonight at 7 p.m.. It is free and open to the public. Later, the film is scheduled to be aired on KUED and possibly on PBS.

Filmmaker G. Scott Porter, who will be in attendance at the screening, says he chose the title after encountering an excerpt from an unknown German POW’s diary entry that reads: “We are part of our people. A splinter of the nation which has been separated into a foreign land.”

Porter says he got the idea for the film after his grandmother told him a story of how she got to know some German POWs who worked on her farm during the summer of 1945.

At first, Porter explained, she despised the prisoners, but as the summer progressed, she grew fond of them and realized that they weren’t all that different from her.

“I was shocked,” Porter said. “Why hadn’t I ever heard of this before? I was even more surprised to learn that my grandmother’s experience wasn’t all that unique. In fact, people throughout Utah and in 46 other states had similar experiences with more than 370,000 German POWs who were held in American during WWII. Yet no film on the subject had ever been made.

After so many years, Porter said he struggled to find living witnesses to interview for his film.

“I talked with every scholar on the subject who had ever interviewed German POWs,” Porter said. “They always told me the same thing; I was 10 years too late. I finally turned to the Internet and, through some intense searching, located a living prisoner and two of his comrades. Their interviews became a critical thread for the film.”

Porter said he spent a year finding living Utahns who had memories of the German POWs and conducted a dozen more interviews for the film.
Also in attendance at tonight’s screening will be Ken Verdoia from KUED. Porter and Verdoia will holding a question-and-answer session after the 56-minute screening.

“Please join us for this important preview of the first-ever documentary about a historic encounter of two cultures at war discovering their common humanity—right here in Utah,” Lori Nay, director of the theater, said.

“Such programs are an important part of the mission of the Casino Star Theatre Foundation.  “We look forward to having a large crowd, so arrive early.”

 

G. Scott Porter

G. Scott Porter

 

 

 

 

Spencer Applegarth

Spencer Applegarth

 

Spencer Applegarth – Sierra Leone Freetown West Africia Mission

 

Spencer Applegarth has been called to serve in the Sierra Leone Freetown West Africa Mission LDS Mission. He will speak on Sunday, Oct. 23 at 1 p.m. in the Mt. Pleasant 4th Ward, located at 40 South State Street (Red Church).

Spencer is the son of Paul and Kathryn Applegarth, grandson of Richard and Marie Stevens of Ephraim and Bill and Jeanne Applegarth of Riverton, Utah.

He will enter the Ghana Missionary Training Center on Oct. 26.

 

Samuel Winkel

Samuel Winkel

 

Samuel Winkel – Hungary Budapest Mission

 

Samuel Winkel returned from serving an LDS Mission in the Hungary Budapest Mission on Oct. 20, his 21st birthday.

Happy Birthday Sam! He will report on his mission on Sunday, Oct 23, 2016 in Sterling at 9 a.m.

He is the son of Darin and Kris Winkel and big brother to Sabrina and Charlie Winkel of Sterling. He is the grandson of Rich and Karen Winkel of Sterling and Ron and Dori Kelsch of St. George Utah.

Venice Sorensen

Venice Sorensen

 

Venice Sorensen, 92, of Spring City, Utah, passed away Oct. 12, 2016.

She was born July 18, 1924 to Henry and Forrest Peterson Noorda in Salt Lake City, Utah.  Married Lee Ray Sorensen March 6, 1942 in the Manti LDS Temple, they enjoyed 68 wonderful years together.

She was a wonderful mother and fabulous cook. Venice will be truly missed by all who knew her.

She is survived by her children, Michael (Jayne) Sorensen, Spring City, UT; Ruth (Joe) Nielson, Fruit Heights; Mark (MaryAnn) Sorensen, Spring City; Neil (Kimberly) Sorensen, Spring City; sister, Carol Joy (Vaughn) Thompson, Mt. Pleasant; eight grandchildren; 15 great-grandchildren and five great-great- grandchildren. Preceded in death by her parents, husband Lee Ray, brother Edwin and sister Beverly.

A visitation was held at Rasmussen Mortuary Monday, Oct. 17, 2016 from 11a.m.-12:30 p.m.  Interment immediately following the visitation in the Spring City Cemetery. Online condolences at rasmussenmortuary.com.

 

The Snow College Art Galley is hosting "Illuminations: Photographic Deconstruction," an art exhibition by Bill Kennedy, artist, published author and professor of photo-communications at St. Edward’s University in Austin, Texas. - Robert Stevens / Messenger photo

The Snow College Art Galley is hosting “Illuminations: Photographic Deconstruction,” an art exhibition by Bill Kennedy, artist, published author and professor of photo-communications at St. Edward’s University in Austin, Texas. – Robert Stevens / Messenger photo

‘Illuminations’ art exhibit opens Friday

 

Robert Stevens

Managing editor

10-20-2016

 

EPHRAIM—The Snow College Art Gallery is hosting a new exhibition by Bill Kennedy, artist, published author and professor of photo-communications at St. Edward’s University in Austin, Texas.

“Illuminations: Photographic Deconstructions” began with an open house reception on Friday and will run until Dec. 16.

“His photographs are incredibly luminous, and his creative process is intriguing,” Adam Larsen, chair of the Art Department and gallery director, said. “Please come and engage with this incredible body of work.”

The Snow College Art Gallery is in the Humanities and Arts Building. Gallery hours are Monday through Friday from  8:30-5:30 p.m. or by appointment.

 

The North Sanpete High performing arts students got creative on and off the stage while at the Shakespeare competition in Cedar City.

The North Sanpete High performing arts students got creative on and off the stage while at the Shakespeare competition in Cedar City.

[Read more…]

Members of the Snow College Residence Hall association make preparations for the upcoming "Scare at the Square Halloween" event. - Matt Harris / Messenger photo

Members of the Snow College Residence Hall association make preparations for the upcoming “Scare at the Square Halloween” event. – Matt Harris / Messenger photo

Come enjoy Snow’s ‘Scare at the Square’

 

Matt Harris

Staff writer

10-20-2016

 

EPHRAIM—In Fall of 2014, an unkempt basement resided uselessly below the Suites at Academy Square, the newest housing estate to Snow College, with its various rooms filled with forgotten clutter and the dust of construction.

One good idea changed all of that when the admissions department was looking to add some extra fun to a Snow Blast; the event where Snow hosts interested high school students from all over the state. Halloween was approaching, and admissions faculty had a proposition for the Snow College Office of Residence Life.

“It started when the admissions department approached us wanting to do an event for [visiting high schoolers],” Snow Housing Coordinator Scott Mathie said. “So we joined forces.”   As orange leaves fell from withering branches, Snow faculty transformed a dusty basement into a multi-theme haunted house.

The tradition began the Friday before Halloween of 2014 and met with instant success,” Mathie said, “so we said, ‘Hey, let’s do it Saturday night as well,’ and the second night Residence Life ran point on it.”

Now, the Residence Life office has passed the torch to the student-governed Residence Hall Association to keep the tradition strong.

“As soon as we heard about it, we wanted it to be a tradition,” Mathie said. “The thing that’s been surprising about it is how quickly our attendance climbed. Our attendance nearly doubled last year, and it was awesome to see that.”

This year, the Residence Hall Association will proudly present “Scare at the Square,” Ephraim’s premier haunted house. This year will feature new rooms, new themes and new ways to frighten.

“We’re looking to mix up the turns and the themes so that it’s more exciting,” Mathie said. “Especially if people have come the last few years.”

Last year, the haunted house, formerly known as Haunted Hallways, hit big, tallying approximately 2,000 admissions. Don’t worry; they all made it back out.

All of the revenue from the Scare goes into the budget for the Residence Hall Association to provide activities for students living on-campus at Snow. “One of the pillars of the Residence Hall Association is programming,” association vice president Coby Jensen said. “We as an association want to provide opportunities for students to have fun and enjoy college. That’s what we hope for. Our hall reps have done a really good job and are working hard on this haunted house. We’ve been really proud of them.”

Scare at the Square will be open Oct. 27-29, and Halloween night from 8 p.m. to midnight. Admission is $2 for general admission and $1 if a student living on-campus.

Inside Our Schools Oct. 14-28

 

Daniela Vazquez

Staff writer

10-20-2016

 

 

As a reminder to those with students in the North Sanpete School District and South Sanpete School District, there will be no school on Thursday, Oct. 20 and 21 for the UEA Convention.

There will also be no school held on Monday, Oct. 24 for students in the North Sanpete School District for fall break.

 

Ephraim Elementary

            The school wants to remind parents there is no school from Oct. 20-21 due to the annual UEA convention.

Students have been collecting box tops to help the school raise money for various projects. All box tops are due by Oct. 31.

The Parent Teacher Association will hold a Safety Awareness Week from Monday, Oct 24 through Friday, Oct. 28. The week was previously known as Red Ribbon Week, but this year, the PTA wanted to focus on multiple aspects of safety for children. Topics will include drugs, bullying and internet safety. Faculty and staff ask that parents encourage students to participate in all of the activities and to be on the lookout for fliers going home with kids that week.

Picture retakes will be held on Wednesday, Oct. 26. If you student needs retakes, please send them to school with their original picture package that day.

 

Fairview Elementary

            There will be no school from Oct. 20- 21 and Monday, Oct. 24 due to the UEA convention.

Parent Teacher Conference (PTC) will be held on Oct. 25-26. Appointment times were sent home with students.  If you have not received an appointment time, please contact the school.

The Parent Teacher Association (PTA) is sponsoring the Scholastic Book Fair during PTC in the school library. Books are also available for purchase during the school day from Oct. 25-27.

The PTA is also hosting the annual Fall Carnival on Friday, Oct. 28 from 5:30-7:30 p.m. at the school. The whole family is invited to enjoy a night of food, fun and games. Costumes are recommended, but not required.

The school is happy to announce their participation to help the Snow College Business Club raise money for the Children’s Justice Center. Please donate personal hygiene items, school supplies, backpacks, blankets, snacks, stuffed animals, etc. Because Halloween is around the corner, they ask for donated costumes as well. A donation box can be found in the schools entrance area. The last day to drop off donations is Oct. 28.

 

Mt. Pleasant Elementary

            Parent Teacher Conferences (PTC) will be held on Tuesday, Oct. 25 and Wednesday, Oct. 26. Notices were sent home with students last week. If you did not receive an appointment, please contact the school.

There will be a book fair and Parent Teacher Association (PTA) signups during PTC’s. All money earned by the PTA will go toward a new swing set for the younger kids’ playground.

 

Moroni Elementary

            The Moroni Elementary Parent Teacher Association hosted their annual Fall Carnival on the schools playground on Friday, Oct. 14. School grounds were filled with food and games the whole family could participate in. Several students donated decorated cakes and other sweets for the cake walk. A highlight of the night was the spook ally. Those brave enough to enter went on a long walk on a dark and heavily decorated stage.

 

Dante Bailey studies his target carefully before he pitches a winning ring around his prize at the Moroni PTA Fall Carnival. - Daniela Vazquez / Messenger photo

Dante Bailey studies his target carefully before he pitches a winning ring around his prize at the Moroni PTA Fall Carnival. – Daniela Vazquez / Messenger photo

 

 

Kids dance around numbers chalked on the ground for a chance to win a decorated item from the calk walk event at the Moroni PTA Fall Carnival. - Daniela Vazquez / Messenger photo

Kids dance around numbers chalked on the ground for a chance to win a decorated item from the calk walk event at the Moroni PTA Fall Carnival. – Daniela Vazquez / Messenger photo

 

Angie Stewart, mother of four, was granted one of the $1,000 Rocky Mountain Power Foundation scholarships.

Angie Stewart, mother of four, was granted one of the $1,000 Rocky Mountain Power Foundation scholarships.

Shelby Trapp was a recipient of a Rocky Mountain Power $1,000 scholarship to help her achieve her goal of becoming a radiologist.

Shelby Trapp was a recipient of a Rocky Mountain Power $1,000 scholarship to help her achieve her goal of becoming a radiologist.

 

Aspiring Snow students get Rocky Mountain Power scholarships

 

Daniela Vazquez

Staff writer

10-20-2016

 

EPHRAIM—The Rocky Mountain Power Foundation granted scholarships to two first-generation Snow College students who both aspire to become medical field professionals.

Angie Stewart of Mt. Pleasant and Shelby Trapp of Lehi were each awarded $1,000 to help them achieve their career goals through Snow College.

Stewart earned her high school diploma at 21 and said she had never put thought into going to college until she began volunteering on the local ambulance crew.

She became inspired to register and enroll in classes at Snow after a friend she met on the ambulance crew spoke of her college experience.

Stewart, mother of four, currently has a 3.7 GPA and began the licensed practical nurse program this fall. She says she loves teaching and learning and plans to continue her nursing education until she earns her bachelor’s degree.

Trapp also plans to pursue a career in the medical field. She says the desire came when her younger sister, Brooklyn, was diagnosed with a rare type of brain tumor.

“As my family navigated through this experience, I have seen firsthand the importance of diagnostic imaging in the treatment of my sister,” she said.

Trapp earned her medical assisting certification from Mountainland Applied Technology College before enrolling at Snow with the goal to become a radiologist.

“Many Snow College students need financial aid and scholarships to complete their education,” said LeAnn Stoddard, chair of the Snow College Foundation. “We thank the Rocky Mountain Power Foundation for this gift and recognize the impact their contributions have on the lives of our scholarship recipients.”

The Rocky Mountain Power Foundation is the philanthropic arm of Rocky Mountain Power. They help to support growth and vitality in the communities they serve through charitable investments. The foundation has awarded more than $58.5 million to a variety of non-profit organizations since 1988.

For more information about the Rocky Mountain Power Foundation, visit www.rockymountainpower.net/foundation.

Ephraim Elementary fifth-graders took a tour of the State Capitol Building where they saw several of the 5,000-pound pure marble columns that stand throughout the century-old building.

Ephraim Elementary fifth-graders took a tour of the State Capitol Building where they saw several of the 5,000-pound pure marble columns that stand throughout the century-old building.

Students travel to Utah Capitol on anniversary

 

Daniela Vazquez

Education coordinator – Staff writer

10-20-2016

 

EPHRAIM—Students at Ephraim Elementary went on a tour of the State Capitol on Oct. 5 to help celebrate the 100th anniversary of the Capitol Building, thanks to fifth-grade teacher Jodi Anderson and Principal Gannon Jones.

The trip started coming together when Anderson and Gannon caught wind of the celebration and that the state was awarding grants to rural schools to take a handful of students on a tour of the Capitol Building.

Gannon wrote a letter to the state and applied for the grant, and shortly after, the school was approved to take Anderson’s fifth-grade class on the trip.

Students walked through the solid marble columns that stand in front of the building and toured the interior where they saw century-old artwork and architecture.

Anderson said some of her students recognized murals of Brigham Young on the rotunda’s dome, but mostly they were fascinated with the height of the dome, which rises 180 feet.

Another highlight for students was seeing the governor’s desk, Anderson said. Although the desk is less than 20 years old, Anderson said, it was the story behind the desk that captured everyone’s attention.

In 1999, a tornado hit Salt Lake City that brought down 93 fully matured trees in the area. State officials had made a decision to salvage the wood of the fallen linden, maple, and Japanese pagoda trees and use it to construct the governor’s desk.

Students also got to see a replica of the Liberty Bell and learned the location of the original is in Pennsylvania.

After a long tour of the Capitol Building and grounds, the class visited the Living Planet Aquarium and got to explore using a more hands-on experience.

 

 

District hears principals’ reports on school ‘power hours’ and programs

 

Lloyd Call

Staff writer

10-20-2016

 

 

MANTI—The South Sanpete School Board heard reports on goals, successes and challenges from  four of its principals at the board meeting last Wednesday, Oct. 12.

Manti Elementary principal Karen Soper said the school was pursuing a $150,000 grant to install new sidewalks all around the school. Manti City will participate in the safety upgrade by doing curb and gutter.

The grant was submitted the end of September, and the school should know by January 2017. The project will probably completed in stages.

Soper also told the board a FranklinCovey-sponsored Leadermete was scheduled at the school on Nov. 2 from 9 a.m. to noon, and students would be conducting the tour.

Manti Elementary, currently a Leader-in-Me school, is seeking so-called Lighthouse status for the school. FranklinCovey grants its coveted Lighthouse designation to schools that fully implement the FranklinCovey leadership model. If successful, Manti Elementary would be only the eighth school in Utah to qualify.

There are 2,275 The Leader-in-Me schools worldwide, including about 60 in Utah. Manti Elementary is the only Leader-in-Me School in Sanpete County. Among all schools worldwide participating in the program, only 242 have achieved Lighthouse status, Soper said.

Soper also discussed how the school uses “Power Hour” to work with individual students needing enrichment activities. In fact, all four of the principals referred to “Power Hour” as very useful. District superintendent Kent Larsen said “Power Hour” was designed to focus on individual needs of each student.

Ephraim Elementary Principal Gannon Jones said new bike racks and new fencing at the school, two capital investment projects from the summer, have improved the organization of the school grounds.

He also talked about his school’s “Second Step” program, which emphasizes learning skills, empathy, emotional management, and problem solving. The program includes an anti-bullying section.

Principal Tim Miller at the Ephraim Middle School told the board that SAGE scores were up, including huge growth in math and science scores.

He reviewed school improvement plans and goals with the school board and noted the school is using a new academic coaching program this year. It utilizes a reading center just off the library where students feel comfortable getting one-on-one help from faculty and even parents. Finally, he noted that students continue to improve in their use of iPads.

Principal George Henrie with Manti High School commented on how nice the new soccer fields are, both for safety and convenience.

He also discussed ACT and SAGE test results, and compared Manti to similar-sized schools in Utah.  “We actually did better this year, except in physics,” he said. And he said the school community council allocated $15,000 for more iPads.

The board also discussed efforts to decrease bullying district-wide and reviewed reports that shows that the Mountain West has the highest level of suicides in the nation.

“There continues to be lots of work we need to do to improve our interventions,” said Superintendent Larsen. A new app, called “Safe Utah” will be added to iPads for all teachers and students. If a student is in crisis, he or she can use the app to connect to a professional therapist immediately. The app also features a tip line enabling users to notify school administrators of any bullying problems.

The superintendent also reviewed the district’s progress on concurrent enrollment with Snow College and Utah State University.

 

Bulldog Isaiah O'Neal gets the tackle in Gunnison's victory against Millard on Friday. - Tiffani Jackson / Messenger photo

Bulldog Isaiah O’Neal gets the tackle in Gunnison’s victory against Millard on Friday. – Tiffani Jackson / Messenger photo

 

[Read more…]

Alex Croyle goes high for a touchdown pass reception that gave Snow the lead in the fourth quarter against Pima. Croyle was part of the Badger passing game that accumulated 456 yards. - Bob Bahlmann / Messenger photo

Alex Croyle goes high for a touchdown pass reception that gave Snow the lead in the fourth quarter against Pima. Croyle was part of the Badger passing game that accumulated 456 yards. – Bob Bahlmann / Messenger photo

Snow comes from behind for exciting homecoming win

 

Bob Bahlmann

Staff writer

10-20-2016

 

EPHRAIM—The Snow College Badgers got back on the winning track with an impressive late-game surge to defeat Pima 43-37 during their homecoming game on Saturday.

The win moves Snow into a tie with Eastern Arizona for third place in the Western States Football League.

In a pre-game interview, Badger coach Britt Maughn felt like his players needed to own the line of scrimmage.

“We need to control their speed and make them pass,” Maughn said.

The Badgers held Pima to 173 yards rushing but failed to establish their own running game. Snow netted only 46 yards running. As a result, the game turned into a fast paced aerial shoot-out with nearly 700 passing yards from the two teams combined.

Snow found themselves in a hole early when the Aztecs scored on their first possession and then again late in the first quarter to go ahead 13-0.

The Badgers got on the board on the second extra-point attempt when Jantz Arbon blocked the kick and then scooped it up to run 98 yards for the two-point score.

Snow narrowed the lead to four points when Justin Miller connected with Brandon Jones on an 80-yard touchdown pass. Three minutes later, the Badgers took the lead on another long pass play, this one for 79 yards to Kiwa Mo’o.

With no time left on the clock, the Aztecs regained the lead on a one-yard run to go ahead 20-16 at the half.

The third quarter saw Pima score twice more with a field goal and then a touchdown to take a 30-16 lead, but the Badgers would not quit.

Starting from their 26-yard line, Miller completed back-to-back passes to Alex Croyle to move the ball to the Pima five-yard line, where Damon Murray ran it in to narrow the lead to seven points.

Next, it was another pass from Miller to Mo’o, this one a 41 yard touchdown completion to tie the game. The go-ahead score came on a 25-yard pass to Croyle for a touchdown and then the Badgers went ahead by 14 when Calief Samon blasted through a hole opened by his blockers on a 37-yard scoring run.

Samon led the Badger ground attack with 45 yards; Murray added 30. Miller completed 24 of 44 passes for 456 yards. Croyle had seven catches for 156 yards, Mo’o had three for 129 yards and Jones caught five for 102 yards.

The Badgers will have a bye this week before traveling to Eastern Arizona on Oct. 29.

Mac Stevens spins away from the defense in the Templars’ loss to Juab. - Photo courtesy Kenny Kirkham

Mac Stevens spins away from the defense in the Templars’ loss to Juab. – Photo courtesy Kenny Kirkham

Manti Templars fall big to Juab Wasps, still headed for playoffs

 

Bob Bahlmann

Staff writer

10-20-2016

 

NEPHI—After clinching a playoff berth, the Manti High football team lost to the undefeated Juab Wasps, 35-3, last week in the final game of the regular season.

All year the Templars have struggled to stop a good running attack. The game at Juab on Friday Oct. 14 was no different. The Wasps ran for nearly 200 yards and added another 190 in the air. They had a total of 388 yards in offense.

“They have good speed and good size,” said Manti coach Cole Meacham, who expressed disappointment with Manti’s performance. “It’s tough to find any positive spin to it.”

Manti finished the game with 76 rushing yards and 41 passing for a net of 117 yards.

The only Templar score of the game came in the fourth quarter when Jorge Lemus booted a 41-yard field goal.

The Templars 2-3 league record is good enough to earn them the fourth-place seed from the 3A South region. That sets up a matchup with Morgan, the top team from the 3A North and also the top-ranked 3A team in the state.

Manti will travel to Morgan on either Friday Oct. 28 or Saturday Oct. 29 to take on the Trojans.

Morgan has an overall record of 7-2. They lost their first two games of the year to Bear River, 14-0, and then South Summit, 22-20. Since then, the Trojans have won seven straight with one more non-league game on their schedule, a contest with North Sanpete this Wednesday.

The Templars do not have a game scheduled for this week.