Archives for February 2017

Tori Pack from Wag-N-Train Dog Rescue with Dax, a dog rescued by the organization. Wag-N-Train recently received a $5,000 grant to help fund their efforts to rescue animals.

Tori Pack from Wag-N-Train Dog Rescue with Dax, a dog rescued by the organization. Wag-N-Train recently received a $5,000 grant to help fund their efforts to rescue animals.

Wag-N-Train rescue awarded $5,000 grant

 

Robert Stevens

Managing editor

2-23-2017

 

 

EPHRAIM—Wag-N-Train dog rescue of Ephraim recently received a $5,000 grant to help Sanpete County residents to fix and vaccinate their pets.

      The grant was awarded to Wag-N-Train by Maddie’s Fund, a nonprofit organization that  helps fund no-kill animal shelters.

      According to Jamie Wheelwright, an officer in Wag-N-Train, one of the most effective way to decrease the number of animals killed in shelters is to spay or neuter pets. Dogs can start having puppies as early as six months old and can have two litters a year. Wheelwright says cats can often have litters even earlier than dogs and can have up to three litters a year.

      “It doesn’t take long to see just how quickly the animal population can get out of control,” Wheelwright said.

      Any Sanpete resident interested in having a pet or pets spayed or neutered can apply to see if they qualify for assistance from Wag-N-Train by downloading an application from the wagntrain.org website under the “Pets for Life” tab.

      Pet owners also have the option of emailing the Wag-N-Train grant manager, Vicki Shaw, at vickishaw@msn.com to request an application or calling 462-0380 and leaving a message. An application can be sent by return email or postal mail.

      Wheelwright says the grant funds will go fast, so residents are encouraged to apply as soon as possible.

      She says a few years ago, cooperation between municipal shelters in Sanpete County and Wag-N-Train  resulted in three shelters receiving $10,000 from Maddie’s Fund for improvements and achieving a 90 percent or higher save rate for shelter animals.

                “This family foundation is dedicated to revolutionizing the status and well being of companion animals,” Wheelwright said.

Gunnison Valley Hospital Births

 

 

            Levi Timothy Stevens was born to Timothy and Christine Stevens of Mt. Pleasant on Feb. 7, 2017. He weighed 8 pounds 3 ounces.

            Clay Jason Fowles was born to Jason and Jamie Fowles of Sterling on Feb. 9, 2017. He weighed 9 pounds 12 ounces.

            Emma Juliana Hull was born to Jason and Mindy Hull of Gunnison on Feb. 11, 2017. She weighed 6 pounds 4 ounces.

            Autumn Anne Hill was born to Casey & Natalie Hill of Centerfield on Feb. 13, 2017. She weighed 8 pounds 11 ounces.

            Cash John Udy was born to Dustin and Roxanne Udy of Gunnison on Feb. 14, 2017. He weighed 7 pounds 8 ounces.

Josie Sorensen

Josie Sorensen

 

                Josie Rachel Sorensen has been called to serve a mission for The
Church of Jesus Christ of Latter-day Saints in the Brazil Sao Paulo
South Mission, reporting to the Sao Paulo, Brazil Mission Training Center on Feb. 27, 2017.
She will be giving her farewell address Feb. 26 in the Axtell Ward at 9 a.m.
Josie is the daughter of Wayne and Ann Sorensen.

 

Kenneth Graham

 
 
 
Kenneth Maitland Graham, 90, passed away suddenly after a good lunch and a hearty song Feb. 19, 2017.

                He will be missed and remembered always, by his large and loving family. He was born July 2, 1926 in Fairview, Utah to Maitland Graham and Marcella Lasson, the fourth of eight children. Kenneth always loved music, singing, and farm work.

                He served in the Army at the end of WWII and then as a missionary in the Texas-Louisiana Mission. He married Julia Christensen of Moroni, Nov. 30, 1951, and graduated with a degree in music from BYU in 1954. Kenneth taught Seminary and public school for five years in Delta, Manti, and Centerfield. Then he served as principal of Manti Elementary for 26 years until retiring in 1989.

                Always a dedicated church member, he fulfilled many callings including Bishop of the Manti Center Ward. With his wife Julia, he served in the California Long Beach Mission and the Manti Temple.

                Kenneth is survived by his wife Julia and eight children: John (Kathryn Peterson), Cynthia Grant (JJ), Andrea Voss (Steve), Michael (Nancy Long), Karl (Cynthia Bates), Leslie Silvester, Walter (Jolene Luthy), Wayne (Mylissa Briggs), 43 grandchildren, over 50 great-grandchildren, brother Gaylen and sisters Allie Stapleton and Beverly Staker.

                He was preceded in death by son Nathan, grandson, Justin Graham, daughter-in-law Kairleee Davidson Graham, and sisters Evelyn Johnson, Beulah Baxter, Norma Winterowd, and Eva Loy Peterson.

                Funeral services will be held 11 a.m. Saturday, Feb. 25, 2017 at the LDS Red Brick Chapel, 295 South Main Street, Manti. Friends may visit with the family from 6-8 p.m. Friday, Feb. 24 and 9:3010:30 a.m. prior to services.

                Interment will be in the Manti City Cemetery with Military Honors by the Manti American Legion Post #31. Funeral Directors: Magleby Mortuary, Richfield, Salina and Manti. Online guestbook at www.maglebymortuary.com.

                The family would like to extend their thanks to IHC Hospice and the loving staff of Country Lane Assisted Living in Mt. Pleasant who cared for Kenneth.

 

Dallen Brown

Dallen Brown

 

Dallen Thomas Brown, son of Michael and Amy Brown passed away Feb. 6, 2017 peacefully in his mother’s arms at home, where he wanted to be. 

                Dallen has truly earned his wings after a long battle with cerebral palsy and a rare brain condition.  Dallen was born on Sept. 24, 2003 in Mt. Pleasant

                Dallen is brother to Mackenzie (Ashli) Brown, St. George; sister MaKayla Brown, Moroni; proud uncle to Riken and Rogue, St. George; grandson to Ronald and Camille Nunley, Moroni; Robert Thomas (R.T.) Brown, Grantsville; great-grandson to Ruby Nunley, Moroni, and a special brother to Brittany (Weston) Miller, Grantsville and  Stevie (Frank) Woods, Tooele

                Dallen had a love for football since the day he was born.  He loved the Dallas Cowboys and watching his big brother’s football games.  After Mackenzie graduated, Dallen turned to rodeo.  From Utah to Mississippi and all the states in between, following his big sister, he was her biggest fan. 

                Dallen is loved by so many and will be truly missed by his mom especially. He will also be missed by his dad, his big brother and his big sisters, grandparents, his two little nephews, aunts and uncles, many amazing cousins, extended family, friends and his rodeo family. 

                Dallen is preceded in death by his very special grandma whom was waiting for him with open arms, Pamela V. Brown; great-grandparents, Bennett and Jean Madsen; Wallace Lee Nunley; also two very special people, Sandy Jones and Bob (Woodsy) Woods. 

                Funeral services were held Wednesday, Feb. 8, 2017 at 1 p.m. in the Moroni LDS Stake Center. Visitation was Wednesday from 11 a.m. to 12:30 p.m.in the Moroni Stake Center. Interment in the Moroni City Cemetery.

                Donations to the family in lieu of flowers would be appreciated. Special thanks to Holly Draper for the love, friendship, and care she gave to Dallen and Amy these last couple weeks.

Online condolence at www.rasmussenmortuary.com.

 

 

Norman Stott

Norman Stott

 

 

                Norman Don Stott, passed away peacefully on Feb. 14, 2017 at his home in Irving, Texas after a long battle with cancer.

                He was born Sept. 5, 1949, in Gunnison, Utah, the son of L. Donald and LaNeice Peterson Stott, one of four children. He grew up in Manti and graduated from Manti High School. He attended Snow College; received his bachelor’s degree in Math/Physics from Weber State College and his Master’s in Education from the University of Utah.

                He joined the Utah National Guard, serving for many years in the Manti unit First Battalion 145th Field Artillery.  In 1980s he joined I-Corp in Salt Lake City.  In 1995 he transferred to the Texas National Guard in the Dallas area, retiring as a SFC/E-7.

                His first love was teaching.  He shared his talent with his students at West High School and Horace Mann Jr. High School in Salt Lake.  He interrupted his teaching career to serve in the military full-time, but returned to his teaching vocation after he retired from the National Guard.  He taught at various schools in the Irving, Texas area.

                He is survived by his wife Sarah; parents Don and LaNeice; sister, Debbie Glazier (Patrick); brother Hal (Mitzi); brother-in-law Cesar Campana; mother-in-law Hilda Campana; step-sons Fernando and Manuel; and many nieces and nephews.  He was preceded in death by brother, David L. Stott and niece, Shannon Dawn Glazier.

                A memorial service will be held in Irving, Texas on Feb. 25.  Plans for a service in Salt Lake City are pending.

Todd Sorenson

Todd Sorenson

 

 

                Todd L. Sorenson, 51, of Sandy, Utah passed away on Saturday, Feb. 18, 2017 after a year-long battle with cancer.

                Todd was born in Gunnison, Utah on Sept. 29, 1965 and grew up in Axtell, Utah.  He was the son of the late Clifford Lynn Sorenson and Rilla Dee Sorenson Beck and was the fifth of six children and was the youngest son.

                He graduated from Gunnison Valley High School in 1983, where he was involved in wrestling, speech and drama and in the Future Farmers of America (FFA), serving as a state FFA officer the year after he graduated. 

                He attended Utah State University being involved with the Latter-Day Saint Student Association (LDSSA).  He served as a missionary for The Church of Jesus Christ of Latter-day Saints in the Taiwan Taichung Mission from 1984-1985.  He received his bachelor’s degree in International Business Management from the University of Utah in 1992.

                From 1989-2005, Todd was the Bursar for Waterford School during its major growth period. He served as Waterford’s construction manager, helped with accounting and also coached the boys’ basketball team for a short time.  Since then, he has been in property management development. 

He married Ava Hassett in May 2001 in the Salt Lake Temple.  They later divorced.  He has one beautiful daughter, Laney.

                He was an active member of The Church of Jesus Christ of Latter-Day Saints, serving as a high councilor and in a bishopric.  He loved teaching his 14-15 year old Sunday School class and they will miss him dearly. In his spare time, he enjoyed golfing, grilling, helping others and spending time with family and friends.  He had a very kind heart and a quick wit.

                He is survived by his daughter, Laney, his mother, his siblings Kerry, Brett (Lisa), Janalee Burbank (Scott), Garth (Jacque), and Sharee, as well as many beloved nieces and nephews.

                Funeral services will be held Saturday, Feb. 25, 2017 at the LDS Chapel at 915 East 9045 South, Sandy, Utah at 11 a.m., with a viewing prior to the service from 9:30-10:30 a.m.  An evening viewing will be held Friday, Feb. 24 from 6:30-8:30 p.m. at the same address.

                A short graveside service will be held at the Gunnison City cemetery Saturday at 4:30 p.m. where he will be buried.

                The family is especially appreciative for the hospice care provided by The Lodge during his final weeks. 

 

Gary Anderson

Gary Anderson

 

       

                Gary Eugene Anderson, age ­­­63, returned to his Heavenly Father from his home in Fairview, Utah on Feb. 18, 2017. 

                He was born Sept. 1, 1953 to Gary Dean Anderson and Maxine McKean Anderson in Mt. Pleasant, Utah.  He was the firstborn of nine children. Eugene learned the value of hard work by helping with the family owned sheep business and farm in Fairview

                Eugene graduated from North Sanpete High School in 1971 and from Utah Technical College in 1976.  He was a lifelong member of The Church of Jesus Christ of Latter-day Saints.  Eugene served as a missionary in the Sacramento North Mission and held many callings, such as Elders Quorum President, Scout Leader and as Ward Clerk. 

                He loved to ride his cherished motorcycle and go out to the desert during the sheep shearing season.  Eugene enjoyed taking his family on sightseeing road trips and was fearless while hiking the beautiful Utah canyons.

                Eugene married Kathy Dee Garff, June 9, 1976, in the Salt Lake City Temple. They settled in his hometown of Fairview, where they raised their six children. Eugene was employed at Utah Power and Light from 1979-2014. 

                Survived by his mother, Maxine Anderson, by his wife Kathy Anderson and their children: Kathryn (Bram) Baughman, Brandon (Tina), Justin (Celeste), Rebecca (Milton) Rosas, Rachel (Grant) Nelson, McKelle (Ben) Davis and 15 grandchildren.  Preceded in death by his father and sister (Peggy Samons) and his beloved sheep-biting dog Sparky.

                A very special thanks to the members of the family, church, community, and friends that helped make his last days with his family special and comfortable.

                Funeral Services will be held Saturday, Feb. 25 at noon in the Fairview 1st Ward chapel (122 South State). The viewing will be at the Fairview 1st Ward chapel Friday evening from 6-8 p.m. and Saturday morning from 10-11:30 a.m. prior to the services.

                Interment will be held in the Fairview City Cemetery. Online condolences at www.rasmussenmortuary.com.

 

 

NSHS leadership students introduce the district food drive to a Spring City Elementary class. From left, high school students Jordan Henson, Mascot ( Cody Booher), Bailee Lucas, Jackson Blackhurst, Denisha Ivory, Addelyn Brotherson, Chase Bailey. Gavin Cox and Brenden Blackham. - Photo courtesy Jeff Erickson

NSHS leadership students introduce the district food drive to a Spring City Elementary class. From left, high school students Jordan Henson, Mascot ( Cody Booher), Bailee Lucas, Jackson Blackhurst, Denisha Ivory, Addelyn Brotherson, Chase Bailey. Gavin Cox and Brenden Blackham. – Photo courtesy Jeff Erickson

 

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Parker Judy (first attendant), Hunter Anderson (Mr. Bulldog 2017), Hunter Peterson (second attendant) pose for the camera after Gunnison Valley High School's Mr. Bulldog contest. - Photo courtesy Melissa Judy

Parker Judy (first attendant), Hunter Anderson (Mr. Bulldog 2017), Hunter Peterson (second attendant) pose for the camera after Gunnison Valley High School’s Mr. Bulldog contest. – Photo courtesy Melissa Judy

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 The Manti High School Greenpower Team and their two-time state champion electric car. Left to right: Jacob Johnson, Alex Stevens, James Ray, Graysen Pierson, Reid Olson, Kenyon Butler, Katelyn Dickinson and Bradon Owens. Not pictured: Brian Taylor and Ethan Larsen - Matt Harris / Messenger photo


The Manti High School Greenpower Team and their two-time state champion electric car. Left to right: Jacob Johnson, Alex Stevens, James Ray, Graysen Pierson, Reid Olson, Kenyon Butler, Katelyn Dickinson and Bradon Owens. Not pictured: Brian Taylor and Ethan Larsen – Matt Harris / Messenger photo

 

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Inside Our Schools 2-23-2017

 

Linda Petersen

Staff writer

2-23-2017

 

 

 

Spring City Officer Keith Nunley defeats Voldemort ( Elijah Hancock), the third villain in the school’s reading competition. Villain No. 3 has been uncovered at Spring City Elementary School. The students read their books, wrote their summaries and raced to get all the clues that, once solved, would reveal the third criminal in the theft of the Diary of a Wimpy Kid Books. The clue was, “I have seen your heart, and it is mine, Harry Potter.” Voldemort from the Harry Potter series is Villain No. 3.

Spring City Officer Keith Nunley defeats Voldemort ( Elijah Hancock), the third villain in the school’s reading competition.

 

Villain No. 3 has been uncovered at Spring City Elementary School.  The students read their books, wrote their summaries and raced to get all the clues that, once solved, would reveal the third criminal in the theft of the Diary of a Wimpy Kid Books. The clue was, “I have seen your heart, and it is mine, Harry Potter.”  Voldemort from the Harry Potter series is Villain No. 3.

The winning team this quarter is from the sixth-grade class: Morgan Zanocco, Elizabeth Dahl, Chelsea Haveron and Kason Tapia.     

 

At the assembly on Monday, Feb. 13, Snow College student/actor, Elijah Hancock, played the part of Voldemort in the skit. Spring City Officer Keith Nunley disarmed Voldemort with the Expelliarmus Curse and escorted the culprit away.

               

There is only one villain/criminal remaining.  Who could it be?  Twelve clues remain.  Will the students at Spring City Elementary School figure it out in time to get the Diary of Wimpy Kid books returned to the school?  We’ll see.

               

EPHRAIM ELEMENTARY SCHOOL

 

Ephraim Elementary students who sold the most chocolate bars in the World’s Finest Chocolate Fundraiser are, from left,  Takoda R.(preschool)  Leo S., Matthew H. and Kenzee C.(third graders).

Ephraim Elementary students who sold the most chocolate bars in the World’s Finest Chocolate Fundraiser are, from left,  Takoda R.(preschool)  Leo S., Matthew H. and Kenzee C.(third graders).

 

 

The students recently participated in the World’s Finest Chocolate Fundraiser.  This year close to 200 boxes of chocolate bars were sold to earn money for school programs and events.  Thank you to all those who supported the fundraiser.  As students sold boxes, they were able to spin a prize wheel and win various items. Students also earned cash prizes depending on sales.  The fundraiser was a wonderful success.  Principal Gannon Jones treated the top sellers to a special lunchtime field trip, and each student received a one pound bar of chocolate.

 

EPHRAIM MIDDLE SCHOOL

 

The orchestra department will have its annual spring concert Thursday, March 2, at 6 p.m. The concert will be held in the Ephraim Middle School Commons.

 

The bands will have their spring concert Wednesday, March 15, at 6 p.m. in the school’s commons. EMS bands will also be participating in the State Bands Festival on Friday, March 17. 

 

Student body officer elections for next year will be held March 13-16, and class elections will be held March 20-24.

 

 

FAIRVIEW ELEMENTARY

 

Fairview Elementary students enjoyed an assembly with York Times Bestselling writer Jennifer Nielsen, author of the Underworld Chronicles, last Friday. Jennifer taught the students that reading is POWER and that students need to work hard to find their inner extraordinary. She also worked with the fourth-graders in a special session.

               

On Valentine’s Day, students performed a flash mob planned by PE teacher Stephanie Nuttall.

               

 

NORTH SANPETE MIDDLE SCHOOL

 

Students at North Sanpete Middle School are in the middle of celebrating FCCLA (Family, Career, and Community Leaders of America) week. The celebration is using different hashtags each day to highlight a different aspect of the program. On Tuesday, students looked for the hashtag #SpeakUp which they could turn in for a chance to win a prize. On Wednesday the hashtag was #DressUp, and students were encouraged to wear red in support of FCCLA. Today, students are being invited to #TeamUp by wearing their favorite team’s shirt and attending the game night from 7 to 8 p.m. at the school where they can play Life, Monopoly and Pay Day. Tomorrow, FCCLA members will provide free hot chocolate, distribute the prizes and provide information about FCCLA.

 

Eighth-grade Letters to the Editor

 

 

Allie Bridges

Allie Bridges

 

Dear Editor,

                The EMS (Emergency Medical Service) is a work force made up of volunteers from around the area they serve. These men and women have studied from six months to two years to be able to fill this position. They have to be on call 24 hours a day, seven days a week. As soon as a call comes in, no matter what the time, the EMS responds as quickly as possible.

                They have saved thousands of lives over the years. So, with all the EMS does for us, how come the people who work for it do not get paid? It is true that in larger places, such as Salt Lake City, the medics get paid for their work. However, in areas that are more rural, such as Sanpete County, the EMS is made up purely of volunteers.

                Everyone says that there is not enough money pay them, but according to www.moneynation.com. the average NBA player makes about $5 million a year. My solution to this problem is, if there is a business or sports team in an area where the EMS serves, the business should be required to donate a part of their annual profit to the Emergency Medical Service.

 

 

Allie Bridges

Parents: Nathan and Shannon Bridges

Ephraim

 

 

 

Alexis Naylor

Alexis Naylor

 

Dear Editor,

                We need to give some appreciation to our special education teachers. They make so many major contributions to our school than most people ever could in their lifetime. I think that these teachers need more appreciation for their service and hard work.

                There are even some people who don’t get paid to take care of these sweet children. It is strictly voluntary for them. I feel like these people should be rewarded for their service. Some autistic children learn so much from these teachers. Our teachers at our school have to be kind and loving, just like Mrs. Chidester from Manti High School.

                These adults, whoever they may be, need to be thanked for all of their hard work and service. There are so many examples of the love that these children feel from these people. They don’t even have to be adults. My sister is 16 years old and she worked with the special education program. She loved the children there so much. She worked with all of the children. She told me about how all of the children can feel accepted. There are no favorites, they just help whoever is in need. I believe that these people do so much for our community. They are great with children and deserve a thank you.

 

 

Alexis Naylor

Parents: Andrew Naylor and Alisha Traina

Manti

 

 

 

 

 

Hope Marsing

Hope Marsing

Dear Editor,

                Have you ever had that worry about you, your friends or your child being bullied? Bullying is a real problem in our schools. I personally know some people in my school that feel like they have been bullied. Seeing your friends or even other people run into the bathroom or get on the bus and start crying because of bullying is hard.

                Bullying isn’t just physical harm, as most people think. Bullying is saying rude or inappropriate comments to another person to harm them in any way. Bullying is also calling someone crude names that are not needed and very unwanted just to hurt a person’s feelings.

                We can solve this problem by talking and interacting with people and the world around us. We can also solve this with many other things if we try. No one wants to see anyone get bullied, If bullying stops our world will be a better place.

 

 

Hope Marsing

Parents: Nick and Christina Marsing

Manti

 

 

 

 

Karra Hacking

Karra Hacking

Dear Editor,

                Have you ever been walking along and a dog comes out and follows you or even attacks you or even (attacks) your dog? Once when I was walking home from school, a dog came out on the street and started to bark at me and even tried to bite me. This has happened more than once.

                Lots of dogs are not chained up. There is a law that says that all dogs need to be on a leash or fenced up. When a dog leaves your property without a leash on, that is illegal. What can we do to keep dogs leashed up? We could make sure all dogs have leashes on or stay on your property.

                I know lots of people that don’t keep their dog on a leash. Those are the dogs that end up at the pound or even dead from chasing cars or biting people or other animals and having to be put down.

                Lots of these dogs are really nice, but if they think someone is trying to hurt their owner, they will attack you. We need to keep our dogs on leashes for our safety and theirs.

 

 

Karra Hacking

Parents: Steven and Kristen Hacking

Ephraim

 

 

 

 

Tyson Meade

Tyson Meade

Dear Editor,

                I would like to say a very needed thanks to the EMTs for all they do and how much they help others. I am very glad to have them around because one night my grandpa wasn’t feeling so good. He was sitting in his chair breathing weird and just wasn’t acting right.

                After my brothers left from their house, my grandpa suddenly fell out of the chair and his blood pressure was not right and was bleeding out! My grandma called my dad and then the EMTs and he was rushed to the hospital. Turns out the medicine he was taking made him feel the way he was.

                I don’t exactly remember what it was like but I know for sure that he had a blood clot in his lung. This was a very serious condition and the EMTs helped him out, and to me, saved my grandpa’s life.

                Now my grandpa is alive today thanks to the EMTs and the hospital. I wanted to thank them for all they do and how much they have impacted my grandpa’s and my life in a good way.

 

 

Tyson Meade

Parents: Brian and Valerie Meade

Ephraim

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Sienna Thompson

Sienna Thompson

Dear Editor,

                I would like thank the bus drivers for taking us from place to place. I feel like the bus drivers don’t get the proper thanks. In this world, we get off, of the bus and say thank you, but I don’t think that is that meaningful. We need to sincerely thank the bus drivers. The bus drivers have to deal with so many things.

                We have some amazing bus drivers in Manti like Joe Dow, Ken Parry, Garry Bringhurst, Doug Birk. We never have to worry about getting to school on time because they always pick us up around the same time. I think that we all need to respect our elders, including the bus drivers.

                If we didn’t have a bus driver, then our parent would have to take us to school. What about the kids that their parent has to go to work really early, how are they going to get to school? When we want to go on a field trip how would we get there? Once again thanks to all of the bus drivers, including the substitute bus drivers. It means a lot.

 

 

Sienna Thompson

Parents: Loren and MaryAnn Thompson

Manti

 

 

 

 

 

McCoy Thomson

McCoy Thomson

Dear Editor,

                I want to thank our linemen for getting up and working in the cold, wet snow this winter. At times like it’s hard to get up early and go to work so we can have power. The reason I know all this is because my dad is a lineman.

                I just really want to say thank you to all the linemen, and next time the power is out, don’t worry. They are out there trying to get the power back on.

 

 

McCoy Thomson

Parents: Brian and Melissa Thomson

Ephraim

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Austin Hunter

Austin Hunter

Dear Editor,

                I’d like to bring up an issue about not having a public roping arena in Ephraim. There are tons of people who would really appreciate it including me. We could pay for it with fund raisers, sponsors and having rodeo events. Also, we could put in for grants from the state.

                I think a good spot for an arena would be west of Ephraim City. Having a roping arena would be a great place to have for after-school programs and extra activities. 4-H can use it for their classes also. People can come and learn about animals and enjoy the outdoors.

                An arena could also be used for sporting events such as a motor cross, drag racing and having tractor pulling races, which can bring large crowds. If there was a top-of-the-line arena, then there is a chance that they could move the fair to Ephraim, which can also bring in income to our city to help pay off the debt.

 

 

Austin Hunter

Parents: Tyler and Ruby Hunter

Ephraim

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Rawlee Mickelson

Rawlee Mickelson

Dear Editor,

                I would like to express my thanks to Manti City Council members for their attempts to sell the street on 1st East to the Church of Jesus Christ of Latter Day Saints. I feel that this could benefit the youth of our city in so many ways.

                The LDS church has offered the city double the value of the street. Manti City has said this money is earmarked for the new sport complex. This will give the youth a safe place to play sports.  Currently the LDS church owns all the surrounding property. UDOT has closed the road, making it a dead end.

                The only thing stopping this sale from happening is a small group who are concerned about their freedom of speech. They feel that if the city sells the property their freedom of speech is being trampled on. They want to sue the city if the sale goes through. I feel that they only want to protest the pageant. I think there are plenty of other streets in Manti they can protest on.

 

 

Rawlee Mickelson

Parents: Ryan and Jennie Mickelson

Manti

 

 

 

 

 

Jacob Norris

Jacob Norris

Dear Editor,

                I love the community of Sanpete. Everyone works together, are so kind and I believe Sanpete has some of the nicest people on earth. I want to thank the people of Sanpete.

                When the trailer park caught fire in Ephraim, I remember the families who lost their homes were immediately offered a living space. Someone set up an address you could go donate clothes to. When I went to bring clothes, I was astonished at how many people were there and the amount of things that had already been donated. When there is a need in Sanpete County, the need will be met.

                I am grateful we have a fire department willing to check on a house and risk their lives everyday. Overall, the people I want to thank the most are the police officers. They keep our cities and streets safe. They risk their lives just for our safety, Without them there would be chaos and things would be totally different.

 

 

Jacob Norris

Parents: Ryan and Jennie Mickelson

Ephraim

Mac Stevens (No. 2) takes it up strong in traffic. Stevens had 11 points in Manti’s season-ending loss to Waterford. - Michael Bahlmann / Messenger photo

Mac Stevens (No. 2) takes it up strong in traffic. Stevens had 11 points in Manti’s season-ending loss to Waterford. – Michael Bahlmann / Messenger photo

 

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Wasatch thumps Jordan, 101-44
Tigers continue to earn No. 1 Utah ranking

 

Matt Harris

Staff writer

2-23-2017

 

            MT. PLEASANT—Once again, Wasatch showed everyone why the No. 1 state ranking is all their own.

            The Wasatch Academy boys basketball team flat-out hammered visiting 5A power Jordan, No. 16 in the state, 101-44. The Tigers now own a 22-4 record on the season and are ranked No. 15 nationally in the USA Today Super 25 poll.

            Wasatch never left the game in doubt, jumping out to a 27-4 lead at the end of the first quarter. The Tigers led 52-19 at halftime. It is the second straight time the Tigers have eclipsed 100 points in a game after blasting Kearns, 104-58, last week.

            While junior Emmanuel Akot provided the lift off on offense to the tune of 34 points, with four threes, it was senior Josip Vrankic who provided the fuel. The Santa Clara University commit went off for a triple-double, scoring 21 points while grabbing 16 rebounds and dishing out 15 assists. Vrankic also contributed five steals and two blocks to complete his jaw-dropping stat line. Senior Michael Okafor chipped in 10 points.

            The Tigers’ season is not over yet. Wasatch is set to face Impact Academy, a different team than the one they played a few weeks ago, literally, on Tuesday, Feb. 28, at 3:45 p.m. It remains to be seen if the Tigers’ season will continue on the national level. Their season resume includes an undefeated record in Utah, with wins over Lone Peak, Layton, Timpview, and Jordan, all top-20 teams in the state.

            They also won the FreeTaxUSA.com Shootout in Orem and the San Bernadino Valley Invitational in California. Their season is marred only by a 0-3 record against nationally-ranked teams: Chino Hills, IMG Academies, and Findlay Prep.

 

 

Badgers come back to win over So. Idaho, then lose to SLCC, 96-83

 

Matt Harris

Staff writer

2-23-2017

 

SALT LAKE CITY — Snow men’s basketball pulled off a comeback victory once again against Southern Idaho before the Badgers hit a snag against Salt Lake.

            The 19th-ranked Badgers beat Southern Idaho, 99-93, and lost to Salt Lake, 96-83. Snow is 4-0 against the Eagles this season, and split their series, 2-2, with the Bruins, winning each of their home games against them. Snow is now 23-5 on the season with an 11-3 conference record, including a spotless 12-0 record at home.

            While the Badgers’ prolific offense keeps them at the top of the Scenic West Athletic Conference (SWAC), their defense has shown flaws whenever they play the Eagles and Bruins, allowing those two teams to average 85.7 points against the Badgers over the season.

            Last Thursday against Southern Idaho, Snow spent much of much of the game in a deficit against the Eagles. Southern held a steady lead over Snow all first half. Snow came back as the first was ending to trim the Eagles’ halftime to a mere three points, 51-48.

            While the Eagles’ maintained the slim lead for much of the second half, Snow took over with 10 minutes remaining behind sharp offensive nights from sophomore Blake Truman and freshman Zach Hunsaker. The Badgers outscored Southern Idaho, 51-42, in the second half to take the victory.

            The Badgers were led by Truman’s double-double night with 24 points and 11 rebounds. Despite shooting only 6-16 from the field, Hunsaker backed up Truman with 19 points.

            Things changed when the Badgers stepped on the home court of Salt Lake. After a close game, nearly from start to finish, it was the Bruins who pulled out the late-game heroics to put away the Badgers. With a Hunsaker three bringing the score to76-75 in the Bruins favor, Salt Lake took the cue to go on a 10-1 scoring run to put the game away.

            Hunsaker led the Badgers with 20 points, while Panter added 17. Bruneel chipped 14 and Truman 11. The Badgers were limited to only 27 rebounds. The 13-point loss is the largest margin of loss for Snow this season except for a 20-point loss to No. 1, undefeated South Plains before conference play began.

            Snow still holds a two-game lead on the top spot in the conference, second to Southern Idaho. They are expected to win out their schedule and claim the No. 1 seed in the upcoming conference tournament.

            The Badgers play their final home game against Utah State-Eastern tonight at 7:30 p.m. before heading on the road for their season finale against Colorado Northwestern on Saturday.