Archives for March 2017

Ephraim will get $55k from watershed protection program

 

James Tilson

Staff writer

3-30-2017

 

EPHRAIM — The City of Ephraim will receive $55,000 from a national program aimed at repairing damage done by natural disasters, and protecting against future ones.

The money is part of $5 million the National Resource Conservation Service (a division under the U.S. Department of Agriculture) is investing in Utah through its Emergency Watershed Protection Program, which aids communities in recovering from or preventing disasters.

“In anticipation of the high runoff we will experience this spring, these projects are especially important to protect life and property in these communities,” said Bronson Smart, NRCS’s state conservation engineer for Utah.

Ephraim City’s portion of the grant is slated for work to repair and prevent erosion of a debris basin above the city, as city economic development director Bryan Kimbvall stated when he presented information of the grant at a meeting of the Ephraim City Council on Wednesday, March 15.

Kimball also presented a bid for a project to repair the Gobblefield settling pond spillway, which had been discovered to have deteriorated due to runoff. A weakness in the spillway’s concrete threatened to undermine a side wall, which could have caused the entire structure to fail if runoff was great enough.

The Gobblefield spillway projects was bid at $69,030. Kimball said federal grants could cover 75 percent of that; the other 25 percent had to come from matching funds.

However, Kimball said, in-kind contributions would cover the match requirement except for about $5,000, which could be split between the city and the Ephraim Irrigation Company.

Work is scheduled to be completed before mid-April and the spring runoff.

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Biggest Gunnison water users will see largest increase in overage rates

 

Robert Stevens

Managing editor

3-30-2017

 

GUNNISON—Overage rates for culinary water have gone up in Gunnison City, especially for the city’s biggest water users, who got a new overage-rate tier and, in the process, a 53-percent overage-rate increase.

Most residents and businesses, both within and outside of city limits, will see their overage rates increase between 20 and 40 cents per 1,000 gallons of overage, or between about 11 and 25 percent depending on which overage tier they fall under (see accompanying table).

But for those who use 2 million gallons or more, the overage rate jumped a buck-ninety from the previous maximum rate of $3.60 per 1,000 gallons, to $5.50 per thousand in the newly created tier.

The rate hikes, affects only overages and not the base rate, was approved during the most recent Gunnison City Council meeting on Wednesday, March 22, following a public hearing on the topic.

Base culinary water rates remain at $33 monthly for 0-4,000 gallons within city limits, and $42 for the same amount of culinary water outside city limits.

Gunnison City Councilman Blake Donaldson said the changes were due to unforeseen costs associated with the Gunnison City Water Project. He said he regretted the rate increase, but that it was necessary.

 

A sign is all that separate Gunnison from Centerfield, but a recently formed committee is looking into how feasible it would be to combine the two contiguous cities.

A sign is all that separates Gunnison from Centerfield, but a recently formed committee is looking into how feasible it would be to combine the two contiguous cities.

[Read more…]

Senior Drew Hill swings at the plate for the Bulldogs against intercounty foe North Sanpete on Tuesday, March 21. Gunnison improved upon its stellar record with 4-2 victory over the Hawks, followed by two more wins in a doubleheader against San Juan.

Senior Drew Hill swings at the plate for the Bulldogs against intercounty foe North Sanpete on Tuesday, March 21. Gunnison improved upon its stellar record with 4-2 victory over the Hawks, followed by two more wins in a doubleheader against San Juan.

[Read more…]

OPINION - Weller editorial cartoon - old hotel

We’ve tried to fish. Now it’s time to cut bait.

For years, Ephraim City has tried to work with multiple owners to get the now infamous Travel Inn at 330 N. Main torn down and something decent put in its place. Sometimes the city has struggled to simply locate the owner of the acre-plus property.

But the 40-unit structure still stands, unboarded-up windows broken out, the disheveled contents of rooms abandoned 15 years ago still visible.

As one woman who testified before the city council in 2014 put it, “It’s embarrassing.” Another woman who spoke at the same meeting said simply, “It’s horrible.”

Now the current owner, who has owned the property nearly two years, is asking for more delays and giving more ambiguous timelines.

Everybody’s worn out. It’s time for the city to jump through whatever legal hoops it needs to in order to get the building condemned. Then the city, calling on volunteer help if needed, must take it down. Once the building is gone, the city could put a lien on the land in the amount of demolition costs.

Consider a partial chronology, drawn from the archives of the Sanpete Messenger.

Six years ago, in April 2011, Councilman Don Olson was one of the first council members to speak out about conditions on Main Street, particularly the motel. If the then owner didn’t tear the motel down promptly, he said, “we need to contact our county building inspector, and if he condemns it, which he will, we tear it down.”

In July, 2011, Olsen spoke out again. “This north end is pretty shabby coming in to our nice little town,” he said. The Messenger carried a large page 1 photo of the motel showing weeds 2 feet high.

In June, 2012, then Mayor David Parrish declared, “This mayor is absolutely serious about cleaning up these buildings that do not meet state, county and city standards for safety and occupancy.” Later in the meeting, Parrish said prophetically, “Nothing is going to happen quickly.”

In July, 2015, City Planner Bryan Kimball told the city council he had good news: The blighted property had been sold at auction. Zions Bank had purchased it and resold it to Branden Kirk, a Spanish Fork realtor. And Kirk had asked for help from the city to tear the motel down.

The city seemed to turn up the heat in 2016. The city council gave City Manager Hanson a deadline of Dec. 31, 2016 to get the building down. Police Chief Ron Rasmussen, whose duties include code enforcement, told the city council a couple of times that one way or other, the building was coming down.

The city council set aside time at one of its meetings to hear from the public about blight in the city. One of the people who spoke was had been the city’s building inspector in time past. He had left to work as a building inspector on the Wasatch Front, then returned to Ephraim to retire. He said if he had been building inspector in Ephraim, the Travel Inn would have come down years ago.

The city paid Sunrise Engineering to do an inspection of the property. Then the city staff and owner Branden Kirk said they needed three more months, until the end of March, to work out a solution.

On March 15 of this year, Kirk visited the council to say he needed the city to approve a site plan for apartments on the site before he could do anything else. City Planner Kimball pointed out that site plan approval typically takes 6-8 weeks.

Once he had an approved plan, the owner said, he would be able to seek investors in the project. And once he had financing, he could give a timeline for demolishing the motel.

Wait a minute. The extended deadline for the building to come down was March 31. That’s tomorrow!

The Travel Inn is more than a blighted motel. It has become a symbol that says, “You can do anything you want here in Ephraim and we’re not going to do anything bout it.”

If we don’t want that kind of thinking to become entrenched in the public consciousness. it’s time to cut bait.

 

 

The six Sanpete students to earn the title Sterling Scholar.

The six Sanpete students to earn the title Sterling Scholar.

[Read more…]

A Cub Scout hands James Nichols, a World War II vet from Mt. Pleasant (see inset service photo), a folded U.S. flag during a ceremony recognizing the service to their country of him and 49 other veterans. The flag ceremony was one of many events held to honor the veterans during the October Utah Honor Flight to Washington, D.C.

A Cub Scout hands James Nichols, a World War II vet from Mt. Pleasant (see inset service photo), a folded U.S. flag during a ceremony recognizing the service to their country of him and 49 other veterans. The flag ceremony was one of many events held to honor the veterans during the October Utah Honor Flight to Washington, D.C.

[Read more…]


Taken in Indianola around the turn of the 20th century by traveling Utah photographer George Edward Anderson, this photo is causing some controversy in Wild West historical circles after modern forensic techniques confirmed two men in the photo to be Butch Cassidy (Robert LeRoy Parker, fifth from L.) and the Sundance Kid (Harry Longabaugh, sitting on cart).

Taken in Indianola around the turn of the 20th century by traveling Utah photographer George Edward Anderson, this photo is causing some controversy in Wild West historical circles after modern forensic techniques confirmed two men in the photo to be Butch Cassidy (Robert LeRoy Parker, fifth from L.) and the Sundance Kid (Harry Longabaugh, sitting on cart).

[Read more…]

Manti soccer takes lead in 2A Central Region

 

Bob Bahlmann

Staff Writer

3-30-2017

 

MOAB—Four games into the regular season, the Manti boy’s soccer team is the only team in the 2A Central Region with an unblemished league record.

With solid wins over Wasatch Academy and Grand County, the Templars look to be the team to beat in region play.

On Tuesday, March 21, the Templars traveled to Wasatch Academy where Cort Olson got the three-goal hat trick to lead Manti to a 3-1 win over the Tigers.

Suatcan Karmazin had the goal for Wasatch Academy.

Thursday, March 23, saw the Templars making the drive to Moab to play Grand County. The Templar defense earned a shutout in the 3-0 win over the Red Devils.

Justin Bawden was in goal for Manti to earn another shutout.

Three Templars scored in the game, with Olson being joined by Dyson Allen and Jorge Lemus, each finding the back of the net.

The Templars will take Spring Break week off. Their next game will be in Manti against Wasatch Academy on Tuesday, April 4, followed bay another home game on Thursday, April 6 against South Sevier.

 

 

Gunnison High varsity baseball player Ty Hill sends the ball infield during a recent game against North Sanpete (full game coverage will be available in next issue).

Gunnison High varsity baseball player Ty Hill sends the ball infield during a recent game against North Sanpete (full game coverage will be available in next issue).

Baseball team ranked No. 2 by Deseret News polls [Read more…]

ACT Aerospace in Gunnison wants to purchase this 19-acre parcel owned by Gunnison City for a new production facility for manufacture of airplane and helicopter parts. The operation could create 100 jobs.

ACT Aerospace in Gunnison wants to purchase this 19-acre parcel owned by Gunnison City for a new production facility for manufacture of airplane and helicopter parts. The operation could create 100 jobs.

[Read more…]

The John Keeler family of Manti celebrate after Keeler receives an award “for distinguished leadership and service” from the Sanpete County Farm Bureau. From left are Keeler children: daughter-in-law Mandy; son Alex; John and Diane Keeler; daughter Jessica and son-in-law Mike Warren; son Jeremy and daughter-in-law Rose Keeler. Not available for picture: son Chris and daughter Leila Keeler.

The John Keeler family of Manti celebrate after Keeler receives an award “for distinguished leadership and service” from the Sanpete
County Farm Bureau. From left are Keeler children: daughter-in-law Mandy; son Alex; John and Diane Keeler; daughter Jessica and
son-in-law Mike Warren; son Jeremy and daughter-in-law Rose Keeler. Not available for picture: son Chris and daughter Leila Keeler.

 

Sanpete County Farm Bureau recognizes John Keeler with Distinguished Service Award

 

Suzanne Dean

Publisher

3-23-2017

 

EPHRAIM—A Manti native who has traveled an estimated 2 million miles and attended upwards of 2,500 local Farm Bureau board meetings received the Sanpete County Farm Bureau Distinguished Service Award last week.

The award was presented to John Keeler, who has retired after 43 years with the Utah Farm Bureau, including 37 years as southwest regional manager.
The presentation occurred at the Sanpete County Farm Bureau’s annual banquet Thursday, March 16 at Snow College.

Wade Eliason of Moroni, president of the Sanpete County Farm Bureau, kicked off the banquet at the Noyes Building by pointing to a new Farm Bureau mission statement printed on the placemats.

The new mission is to “inspire all Utah families to connect, succeed and grow through the miracle of agriculture.”

A corollary statement said, “We bring value to every citizen and community through love of God, family, country and the land. We work for those who work to feed and clothe the world.”

The Farm Bureau is no longer “just about farmers,” Eliason said. “It’s about every citizen in this state of ours.”

John Eliason, agent for Farm Bureau Insurance, a subsidiary of the Utah Farm Bureau, read a biography of Keeler and helped present the award plaque.

Keeler was born in Manti into a farm family. His father, Paul, was a farmer and his mother, Bernice, a school teacher. His uncle, Aldon Barton, was Utah commissioner of agriculture for many years.

“John grew up in Manti working on his dad’s farm with all the freedoms and privileges of a young man growing up in small-town Utah in the 1950s,” Eliason said.

He graduated from Snow College, earned a bachelor’s degree in animal science from Utah State University, and in 1974, joined the state Farm Bureau office in Salt Lake City.

While in Salt Lake City, he helped organize producers into farm commodity groups. He also set up something called the “Safemark Battery and Tire Program,” which continued for another 20 years, enabling Farm Bureau members to get discounts on products.

In 1980, he moved back to Manti to help take care of his elderly parents. After a brief hiatus from the Farm Bureau, he rejoined the organization as manager for 10 counties—Sanpete, Sevier, Wayne, Piute, Garfield, Millard, Beaver, Iron, Washington and Kane counties.

His duties included overseeing county-level Farm Bureau groups, including attending board meetings. “And he is always the first one there,” Eliason said.

He worked on agriculture issues with state and federal agencies ranging from the Forest Service, BLM and USDA to the Utah Division of Wildlife Resources and Utah Division of Fire, Forestry and State Lands

That role included “submitting hundreds of comments on actions taken by these agencies and trying to solve problems arising from those actions,” Eliason said.

Meanwhile, he served on 11 elk committees, three sage-grouse committees, a bison committee, a pronghorn committee, a prairie dog committee and several land planning committees. “He obviously likes committees,” Eliason joked.

Keeler’s wife, Diane, said his family calls him the “human Utah road map,” because he has driven, and knows, almost every road in the state.

He also knows a lot of people—and they know him, Diane said. Once she joined friends on a bus trip that went from St. George to California, she said. At the beginning of the trip, everyone introduced themselves.

When she introduced herself as Diane Keeler from Manti, “half the people on the bus were asking, ‘Are you related to John? Do you know John?’”

In accepting the award, Keeler said simply, “I love you all. I’ve appreciated working for the Farm Bureau. We have to keep it up.”

Eliason mentioned that Keeler plans to spend much of his retirement working on his family farm and already has a new tractor.

John and Diane Keeler have five adult children. Jeremy, Alex and Jessica all live in Manti. Christopher and Leila live in Oregon.

 

 

 

John Keeler gets a hug from John Eliason, local agent for Farm Bureau Insurance after Keeler receives the Sanpete County Farm Bureau Distinguished Service Award.

John Keeler gets a hug from John Eliason, local agent for Farm Bureau Insurance after Keeler receives the Sanpete County Farm Bureau Distinguished Service Award.

At the recent Ephraim City Council, the owner of the dilapidated motel on Ephraim Main Street gave the council his reasons for not being able to commit to a date for demolishing the motel. Among other reasons, property owner Branden Kirk, said he was waiting to find out if hazmat measures would be required for ceiling tiles containing asbestos.

At the recent Ephraim City Council, the owner of the dilapidated motel on Ephraim Main Street gave the council his reasons for not being able to commit to a date for demolishing the motel. Among other reasons, property owner Branden Kirk, said he was waiting to find out if hazmat measures would be required for ceiling tiles containing asbestos.

Travel Inn owner explains demolition delays: Ephraim wants more prompt action

 

James Tilson

Managing editor

3-23-2017

 

EPHRAIM —The owner of the dilapidated Travel Inn on Main Street in Ephraim told the Ephraim City Council last week that if it were up to him, the building would have been demolished “yesterday.”

But Branden Kirk, who lives in Utah County, said he is facing challenges in getting investors to commit to his plan to build apartments for young couples, especially since he doesn’t have a plan approved by the city yet.

“The margin [for businesses in Ephraim] is thin,” Kirk said.

At a work meeting before the regular city council meeting on Wednesday, March 15, the council reminded Kirk that City Manager Brant Hanson had told them the building would be gone during the first quarter of 2017.

“I’m hearing from constituents almost every day, asking when something’s going to be done about it,” Councilman John Scott said.

Scott asked if there was a timeline for condemnation of the building.  Kirk answered that he would like to pursue a development agreement with the city where his company, Amp Development, would obtain plat approval from the city and then would set a timeline for tearing down the building and building new structures.

Bryan Kimball, city development director, said plat approval usually takes six to eight weeks.  Kirk again cited his investors as a limiting factor in being able to say exactly when he could begin demolition.

“To tear it down without knowing what would be approved—the cost would be prohibitive,” Kirk said.

Kirk asked the council if the city could contribute equipment to the demolition. The city council was vocal in supporting the idea, especially if it could speed up the demolition of the building.

Kirk said his plan would not be aimed specifically at student housing but targeted more toward “young couples.”  The apartments would be one and two bedroom configurations, and the buildings would probably be two stories, he said.

Kirk said he would need to get approval for the plan from the city before getting official drawings and engineering done.

At the end of the meeting, Scott again asked whether, if the city assisted with the demolition, the building be could be knocked down by the end of March. Scott also suggested that the property be fenced off from the public.

Kirk promised he would review his plans to see if Scott’s requests would be possible. Kirk also noted that demolition would depend on getting permits from the city regarding air quality because the ceiling tiles in the hotel were made with asbestos and removal could require hazardous-materials procedures.

The council promised to work with him and urged speed. Councilwoman Marge Anderson said the council had been willing to work with him so far because of promises to demolish the building before the end of March, but that if the demolition dragged on without resolution “it would not be pretty.”

 

 

Sanpete County Sheriff Brian Nielson (left) with JoAnn Otten, chairwoman of the board of the Sanpete County Children’s Justice Center; Rep. Derrin Owens; and Gunnison Valley Police Chief Brett McCall. In the picture, Owens is holding a sign Otten had commissioned for him for all the work he has done to help pass HB149 (also known as "Miley's Bill) in Legislative Session. The bill, if signed by the governor, will create a child abuse registry system similar to the current sex offender registry.

Sanpete County Sheriff Brian Nielson (left) with JoAnn Otten, chairwoman of the board of the Sanpete County Children’s Justice Center; Rep. Derrin Owens; and Gunnison Valley Police Chief Brett McCall. In the picture, Owens is holding a sign Otten had commissioned for him for all the work he has done to help pass HB149 (also known as “Miley’s Bill) in Legislative Session. The bill, if signed by the governor, will create a child abuse registry system similar to the current sex offender registry.

Sanpete officials take lead on ‘Miley’s Bill’ to create child abuse registry

 

Robert Stevens

Managing editor

3-23-2017

 

With help from Sanpete County supporters, a bill to implement a registry system for felony child abusers passed in the House and Senate during the 2017 Utah Legislature and is now waiting for the governor’s approval.

Miley’s Bill, or HB149, sponsored by Rep. Derrin Owens, R-Fountain Green, will add a child abuse registry to the existing sex offender registry website.

The child abuse registry will be similar to the sex offender registry, Owens said. Any person convicted of felony child abuse will be required to register. The person’s name will stay on the registry for 10 years or for life, depending on the seriousness of their offense.

Joann Otten, grandmother to the child the bill was named for, said the registry will enable the public to find out if someone dangerous has or could come into contact with their children.

Single mothers looking into new boyfriends or parents looking for babysitters could use the registry to their benefit, Otten said.

Otten said she came up with the idea for a registry when she heard about a similar bill that was about to pass in Indiana.

“I was a new representative when JoAnn originally approached me,” Owens said. “I was touched by her story but didn’t have enough experience yet to know what to do to make it happen.”

After Indiana’s child abuse registry passed in July 2016, Owens began looking into how the Indiana law worked. He and Otten talked about moving forward with a similar proposal. They announced Miley’s Bill with a balloon release party in October 2016.

Although some things went smoothly, the bill generated fair share of opposition. “The were some special interest groups that had different ideas than us,” Owens said. “It was disheartening to hear they were against the bill at a meeting JoAnn and I attended.”

During Owens’ and Otten’s push to get the bill through the Legislature, a woman came forward and said she had been abused as a child but didn’t want her father to show up on the registry.

“That was a hard pill to swallow, but we pushed forward,” Owens said.

The opposition held up the bill in an initial committee. At that point, Owens and Otten turned to Sanpete County Sheriff Brian Nielson and Gunnison Valley Police Chief Brett McCall.

As members of the Utah Law Enforcement Legislative Committee (ULELC), Nielson and McCall helped fine-tune the language of the bill, making it more palatable to the opposition, as well as marshal law-enforcement support for the measure.

“When the bill was held up in an initial committee, they really helped us put some legs underneath it,” Owens said.

McCall and Nielson have a lot of history dealing with child abuse. Three weeks after McCall was hired as Centerfield City Police Chief, the two worked together on a child abuse homicide case.

“This is something we believe in,” Nielson said. “We want to speak for those victims who can’t speak for themselves.”

Owens said he took the bill back to the committee, where it passed. The proposal then went to the House floor where it passed 75-0.

But he didn’t get the same kind of support in the Senate. “When we hit the Senate committee, we started getting some friction,” Owens said.

Owens and Otten both say Sen. Ralph Okerlund, R-Monroe, the bill’s sponsor in the Senate, was key in garnering the support needed to pass the bill in the Senate. The bill needed 15 votes to get out of committee. In the end, it passed 15-12, Owens said. Subsequently, it passed on the  Senate floor.

“Representative Owens had the key parts of the bill nailed down,” Nielson said. “There just needed to be some help explaining things to build support.”

One of the key points of friction, Owens said, was whether people already convicted of child abuse should be added to the child abuse registry retroactively. Some committee members felt it would put a burden on law enforcement to go back years and identify child abusers to be added to the registry.

“The question was, how far do we go back,” McCall said. “We had to address that to get the bill where it needed to be.”

Eventually, Nielsen said, they settled on the registry listing only new convictions along with people on probation or parole who have prior felony child abuse convictions.

Another topic of debate was how long an offender would stay on the registry. Nielson said they settled on a life term for first-degree felony child abusers, and a 10-year term for second or third-degree felony abusers, provided the second-degree and third-degree offenders do not offend again during the 10 years.

According to McCall, the well-established sex offender registry paved the way for a child-abusers registry.

“It’s taken some time for the sex offender registry to get where it needed to be,” McCall said. “It’s a pretty well-oiled machine right now, and that’s what we’re are looking to have happen with the child abuse registry. We kind of have a road map to follow because the sex offender registry came first.”

Nielson said people don’t have to worry about getting on the registry for minor disciplinary actions, such as spanking.

“This is aimed squarely at felony abusers,” Nielson said. He explained that when an act or omission by any person negligently, recklessly, intentionally or knowingly injures a child, then that person can be charged with felony child abuse.

Owens said the bill has a “favorable” chance of being signed by the governor.

“It’s been quite a journey,” Owens said. “I am a school counselor by trade. Children are near and dear to my heart. There is no excuse for child abuse at any level.”

Otten said she is glad the bill has come this far, if nothing else, to increase awareness and prevention. She hopes one day every state in the nation will have a similar registry.

 

 

 

Mayors, commissioners put heads together, prioritize CIB projects

If Impact Board runs short of funds, list could be ‘extremely important’

James Tilson

Staff writer

3-23-2017

GUNNISON—A group of county and municipal leaders at the Mayors and Commissioners Meeting prioritized the list of projects throughout the county that are seeking funds from the Community Impact Board (CIB).

Travis Kyhl from the Six County Association of Governments addressed the Mayors & Commissioners Meeting on March 9 to explain the prioritization of its “one year list” for CIB grant applications.

Sanpete County Commission Chair Claudia Jarrett had asked Kyhl to attend the meeting to explain why the CIB was now requiring a list of projects, and prioritization of that list. Kyhl had a simple explanation, “because the CIB told us to.”

Kyhl said prioritization had been a rule for years, but it had not been properly enforced until now.

However, Kyhl says the CIB wants the project list to be more realistic. The “one year list” has to be a real planning document. Funding that the CIB relies on is not as plentiful as it had been before, Kyhl said, and the CIB wants to be prepared in case prioritization becomes a necessity.

“The day may come when CIB does not have enough money to fund all of your projects, and then this list becomes extremely important,” Kyhl said.

Jarrett said that each city and the county had submitted at least one project to the commission for inclusion on the “one year list” and the representatives gathered that night would vote to rank the projects. After brief presentations by the attending representatives, Jarrett announced the rankings.

First, Spring City’s redevelopment of city wells and springs project, at an estimated project cost of $200,000.

Second, Fountain Green’s new fire station building project, at an estimated cost of $700,000, of which only $634,000 would be funded from the CIB.

Third, Gunnison City’s safe to school sidewalk project, at an estimated cost of $250,000, of which $200,000 would be from the CIB.

Fourth, Centerfield’s community center restroom project, at an estimated cost that had yet to be determined.

Fifth, Sanpete County’s boundary survey project, at an estimated cost of 180,000.

Sixth, Ephraim’s new well design and construction project, at an estimated cost of $1,500,000, of which $375,000 would be from a CIB grant.

Seventh, Mayfield’s zoning update, for economic development and housing, at an estimated cost of $30,000.

Eighth, Fayette’s spring protection program, at an estimated cost of $$1,220,000, of which $333,000 would be from a CIB grant.

Ninth, the second phase of Fairview’s sports park project, at an estimated cost of $575,000.

Tenth, the third phase of Fayette’s roads and streets project, at an estimated cost of $96,000.

Eleventh, Mt. Pleasant city’s culinary water treatment plant project, at an estimated cost of $3,300,000, of which $825,000 would be from a CIB loan and $825,000 would be from a CIB grant.

            Mt. Pleasant Mayor David Blackham told those in attendance at the meeting that water engineers had told the city leadership that the funding for their culinary water project would be available from other sources, and thus he urged the representatives to put Mt. Pleasant’s project at the bottom of the lis

Civic areas such as this city welcome sign are to be part of Mt. Pleasant's Adopt a Garden program, where civic, youth, church or other local groups are encouraged to volunteer to keep the area landscape maintained.

Civic areas such as this city welcome sign are to be part of Mt. Pleasant’s Adopt a Garden program, where civic, youth, church or other local groups are encouraged to volunteer to keep the area landscape maintained.

 

Adopt a Garden in Mt. Pleasant

Public support sought to maintain landscaping in civic areas throughout city

James Tilson

Staff writer

3-23-2017

MT. PLEASANT — Mt. Pleasant is asking civic, youth, church and local groups for help keeping the city beautiful through its “Adopt-A-Garden” program, headed up by Heidi Kelso, Mt Pleasant city councilwoman.

Kelso is on the city’s beautification committee and is the contact person for the program. According to Kelso, the city maintenance crews do not have the time or workforce to attend to the landscaping maintenance that the city’s civic areas, such as the welcome signs or the city hall, would naturally need.

For a long time, Kelso says she has tried to keep up with the gardening herself, to no avail.           “Something that has bothered me for a long time is that the welcome signs are beautiful, and they just sit there and get covered in weeds,” Kelso said.

Mt. Pleasant is offering to supply all the materials for maintaining the garden areas and asking local civic groups to take on the gardening responsibilities. The six areas that need help are the north and south welcome signs, the city hall, the library, the recreation center and the cemetery. Interested groups are directed to contact Kelso at 469-0107.