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The Sanpete Messenger

North Sanpete thespians travel to Cedar City to compete, place 9th

The North Sanpete High performing arts students got creative on and off the stage while at the Shakespeare competition in Cedar City.
The North Sanpete High performing arts students got creative on and off the stage while at the Shakespeare competition in Cedar City.

North Sanpete thespians travel to Cedar City to compete, place 9th

 

Daniela Vazquez

Staff writer

10-20-2016

 

CEDAR CITY—A group of North Sanpete High performing arts students competed against students from 20 other schools at the 40th annual Shakespeare competition from Oct. 6-8.

The Shakespeare competition gives junior and high schools students from around the nation a chance to present material from Shakespearian literature in various artistic forms.

The group was composed of students who had never performed Shakespeare and had never competed in such a competition, yet several of the students placed in their individual categories.

Salem Kimball and Trayson Thompson were among the first place title holders. The duo performed a scene from Comedy of Errors in three separate rounds.

Donnivan Kubota performed a monologue from King Henry VI part III and took first place in one round, and third in two rounds.

Brynne Lamb and Aidan Anderson took second in one of their three rounds with a scene from Othello.

Emily Hill performed a monologue from King Henry VI part III and placed second in one of her rounds and third in her two other rounds.

Mikayla Hill also performed a monologue from King Henry VI part III and received high ratings for her performance.

Overall, the team placed ninth out of the 20 schools in their division, but what makes these students stand out is that 17 of the schools in the division were private, prep and performing art schools.

Drama teacher Alex Barlow said his students are excited to learn better performing skills and attend the competition next year.

“Going to Shakespeare is an incredibly valuable experience for students,” he said. “Doing Shakespeare is definitely difficult and since it’s a competition, it forces them to really stretch themselves.”