E-Edition

Manti Library plans big organizing project

Books like these may soon be even more antiquated than they already are. In an effort to preserve their historical archives, the Manti City Public Library is hoping to digitize all of these historical records in the near future. - Matt Harris / Messenger photo
Books like these may soon be even more antiquated than they already are. In an effort to preserve their historical archives, the Manti City Public Library is hoping to digitize all of these historical records in the near future. – Matt Harris / Messenger photo

 

 

Manti Library plans big organizing project

 

Matt Harris

Staff writer

12-1-2016

 

MANTI—The Manti City Public Library has some goals for the near future.

The library is openly seeking volunteers to assist in their upcoming inventory process. The process will involve detailed accounting of all books and materials in the library and may require some lifting, mostly involving the handling of books on the shelves, all of which have to be scanned into the system.

Manti Library Director Lynnzie Williams, who began last May, says that although the process is not mandatory annually, the fact that it hasn’t been done in three years has had an effect on the organization of the library.

“It’s just a good idea to know what we have,” Williams said. “Right now, our shelves are so cluttered, and lots of things aren’t in order.”

The request was presented to Manti City Council by Councilman Gary Chidester, who affirmed that the inventory count hadn’t taken place in a while.

Although Williams confirmed that no shelving would be moved, some zoning changes are in the plans as well, mainly an extension of the adult section.

Dates for inventory are scheduled for the beginning of January. Those who are interested in helping can contact the Manti Library directly at 435-835-2201.

Chidester also stated in council that the library has plans to digitize their history room. The history room, located downstairs, is dedicated to the preservation of Manti History and historical public records.

Currently, Williams describes the history room as “a disaster.” There is no formal organization of the contents of the room.

“We have no idea exactly what we have,” Williams said. Consequently, the history room has proven to be less than user-friendly.

In addition to the organizational struggles, the antiquity of many of the records kept in the room render them unfit to be consistently handled, otherwise, they would quickly depreciate.            Some of the records are even suspected to have been stolen, Williams says.

“We have some really important history in that room that is not being taken care of as it should be.”

The process of preservation will likely involve digitally scanning individual pages of each body of writing in the historical archives.

“We can digitize it all and put everything online,” Williams said. “If a patron wants to keep it, they can get a copy. That way, the paper gets put somewhere where it can be safe.”

As for what will be done with the antiquated records, their future destination is unknown.

As yet, there is no timetable for when this process will occur, as the library lacks the funding to obtain the technology required for the digitization. A scanning machine is desired to speed up the process.