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The Sanpete Messenger

Manti students supporting Pulsera Project to help support Latin American families

Students at Manti High are gearing up to host another Pulsera Project, a campaign designed to help the people of Latin America provide a sustainable way of life.
Students at Manti High are gearing up to host another Pulsera Project, a campaign designed to help the people of Latin America provide a sustainable way of life.
Manti students supporting Pulsera Project to help support Latin American families

 

Daniela Vazquez

Staff writer

9-15-2016

 

MANTI—Hanna Harmston, Manti High School foreign language Sterling Scholar, and Spanish teacher Olga Willey, want to color the school and the community with the Pulsera Project, a campaign that helps Latin American’s support their families.

Last year, students in Willey’s Spanish class learned about the Pulsera Project and how and why the colorful woven bracelets are made.

Willey said students discovered the harsh reality of how third-world people live, but through the project over 150 artists of Nicaragua and Guatemala are able to provide basic necessities for their families by joining with schools around the nation to sell hand-woven bracelets.

Inspired by what they learned, Willey says her Spanish students went on to educate other classes who also became inspired to help make a change.

“This project is a window to the world to connect with other cultures,” Willey told the Messenger.

Several of the schools Sterling Scholars from Manti High were involved last year, which helped to supplement the students’ growing portfolios.

“She wants to take a step forward to connect and help others,” Willey says. “Even from a small town in Central Utah, we can do a lot.”

Bracelets will be sold in the school cafeteria during the week of Sept. 26 and extended to Oct. 7. Willey plans on getting Ephraim and Manti elementary schools involved in the project to help increase profits for artists.

All proceeds will go toward providing jobs for over 150 Latin American artists, as well as supporting education, scholarships, workers’ rights and community development.

Willey says Sanpete doesn’t have many opportunities for students to learn about the Latin American culture and she hopes during the course of the year students will be able appreciate and connect with an alternative way of life.